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Written by November 07 2017 0

Having now won crucial Colombian government licenses for cultivation and production of medical marijuana products with “unlimited” percentages of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), Toronto-based PharmaCielo now aims to launch production and commercial marketing in 2018.

In a November 7 interview with Medellin Herald, Federico Cock-Correa, the Medellin-based CEO of PharmaCielo Colombia Holdings, told us that the company now faces only one remaining regulatory hurdle: a production “quota” that he expects would be approved soon by Colombia’s Justice Ministry.

The Ministry must issue such quotas following limits mandated by the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) -- or, as known in Spanish, the Junta Internacional de Fiscalización de Estupefacientes (JIFE).

INCB works with national governments “to ensure that adequate supplies of drugs are available for medical and scientific uses and that the diversion of drugs from licit sources to illicit channels does not occur,” according to the agency.

INCB also “administers a system of estimates for narcotic drugs and a voluntary assessment system for psychotropic substances and monitors licit activities involving drugs through a statistical returns system, with a view to assisting governments in achieving a balance between supply and demand,” the agency adds.

According to Cock-Correa, following issuance of the “quota,” Colombia would be the first target market for PharmaCielo’s pioneering medical-marijuana products.

Potential distribution chains could involve feedstock sales to third-party pharmaceutical producers as well as direct sales through retail pharmacies and supermarkets.

But the company is also targeting international markets including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Peru and South Africa -- along with more than a score of other countries that are moving to legalize medical marijuana, he explained.

While some U.S. states have enacted marijuana legalization measures, the U.S. as a whole has yet to adopt a single, uniform regulatory-permission scheme. As a result, PharmaCielo might have to wait a few more years for future U.S. regulatory evolutions that would enable broad market penetration there, Cock-Correa explained to us.

Despite U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recently expressed hostility toward marijuana legalization, ironically there’s a growing rationale for broader legalization of medical marijuana in the U.S. -- thanks in part to U.S. President Donald Trump recently declaring that the U.S. is in the midst of a horrific opioid-addiction epidemic.

Rationale for legalization: In recent years, several health researchers have published studies concluding that relatively non-addictive medical marijuana could at least partially substitute for highly addictive opioids in pain control -- hence potentially helping to stem opioid abuse.

Other claimed health benefits for medical-marijuana products include stress reduction, sleep inducement, appetite enhancement, nausea reduction (for patients using certain cancer drugs), headache relief and glaucoma relief. However, researchers also have cautioned that medical marijuana can have detrimental effects on attention-span, judgment and balance.

Asked what factors are key to achieving success in the emerging medical-marijuana market, Cock-Correa pointed out to us that scientific research, development and quality control throughout the entire process -- from cultivation to manufacturing of extracts – are critical.

For example: Artisanal and illegal marijuana-extract producers (whose products are found in the Colombian market today) don’t necessarily ensure that an end-product is free of harmful metals, chemicals or other contaminants. Nor can the efficacy of certain illegal products be guaranteed.

But besides ensuring relatively high quality products, legal producers also could benefit from being first-to-market with certain specialties, he added.

High-quality research-and-development, cooperation with quality, licensed producers of marijuana feedstocks, potential deals with third-party pharmaceutical manufacturers, marketing deals with big retail chains, and ability to produce a suite of high-quality products for various niche markets are all factors that could favor legal producers over illegal producers, he added.

Colombia’s more-than 50-years’ experience in ornamental flower production on a massive, industrial scale – plus its relatively favorable climate and competitive costs-of-production-- are additional factors favoring legalized medical-marijuana producers here, he said.

As for potential misuse of medical marijuana for recreational use, Cock-Correa pointed out that this same problem already occurs with alcohol or other products that have both medical and recreational -- and sometimes addictive -- applications.

So, while legalized medical-marijuana producers can do their best to warn against misuse -- and also employ control methods to prevent illegal diversion -- consumer education and government enforcement also must be part of the solution to minimize this problem, he concluded.

Written by November 02 2017 0

Medellin-based electric power transmission giant and multinational infrastructure operator ISA reported November 1 that its third quarter (3Q) 2017 net income rose 30.8% year-on-year, to COP$317 billion (US$103 million).

The improvement mainly came as a result of greater revenues, a decline in finance costs and favorable Brazilian tax-and-compensation provisions for operations there.

Consolidated operating revenues for 3Q 2017 rose to COP$1.9 trillion (US$620 million), while consolidated net income rose to COP$565.8 billion (US$184 million), according to the company.

Consolidated earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) for the latest quarter hit COP$1.18 trillion (US$385 million) with an EBITDA margin of 64%.

Capital investments during 3Q 2017 totalled COP$643 billion (US$210 million).

In Colombia, ISA invested COP$197 billion (US$64 million) in projects under construction, including the Ituango and Caracolí power substations and the Chinú-Montería-Urabá and Cerromatoso-Chinú-Copey transmission lines.

In Peru, ISA invested COP$154 billion (US$50 million) in various power-distribution construction projects.

In Chile, ISA invested COP$236 billion (US$77 million) in transmission and transformer projects, as well as COP$7.7 billion (US$2.5 million) in security and lighting projects for several of its highway concessions.

Written by November 01 2017 0

Medellin-based multinational utilities giant EPM announced October 31 that it successfully placed a COP$2.3 billion (US$764 million) 10-year bond offering at 8.375% interest.

“This is the third international issue denominated in Colombian pesos,” according to the company. Wall Street bond rater Fitch gave the issue a “BBB+” rating while Moody’s gave it a “Baa2” rating.

“With this issuance, made in order to prepay debt in dollars, the profile of the company’s debt is improved,” according to EPM. The latest placement takes advantage of the “current financial conditions of the international market,” according to the company, whose sole shareholder is the municipality of Medellin.

For the issue, about 60% of the bond buyers were from the United States, Europe, Chile, and Peru, while the remaining 40% were Colombian investors, according to the company.

“Thanks to this issue, we managed to make an important debt-management operation, which will allow us to improve the maturity profile and the average life of the debt,” added EPM general manager Jorge Londoño de la Cuesta.

“In addition, we will increase our debt composition in Colombian pesos, which will allow us to reduce EPM’s exposure to debt denominated in dollars, thereby minimizing the impacts derived from foreign exchange risk,” he said.

Funds from the bond issue will prepay a loan due in 2020, which was signed with seven banks in 2015. In total, 45% of the issue funds are going toward the construction of the US$5.5 billion, 2.4-gigawatt “Ituango” hydroelectric project in Antioquia, with the remaining 55% going to support other investment plans.

Spanish bank BBVA, U.S.-based Bank of America Merrill Lynch, and UK-based HSBC served as placement bankers for the issue.

Written by November 01 2017 0

Medellin-based textile giant Fabricato announced October 31 that its third quarter (3Q) 2017 net loss hit COP$19 billion (US$6.2 million), down from a COP$755 million (US$248,000) net profit in 3Q 2016.

Sales in 3Q 2017 also fell 23.5% year-on-year, to COP$85 billion (US$28 million), while earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) margin fell to a negative 7.5%, down from a positive 12.8% in 3Q 2016.

“The period covered by this [latest quarterly] report was surely one of the most negative for the [Colombian] textile sector in recent years,” according to Fabricato.

“The textile and apparel sectors presented results that were much lower than those budgeted for the period, as well as being inferior to those generated in the immediately preceding year,” the company added.

While Colombia’s relatively feeble 1.8% growth in GDP this year is partly to blame for the declines, the hike in value-added tax (VAT) this year to 19% (from 16% last year) and relatively high interest rates were additional negative factors, the company noted.

Another key factor was the November 2016 termination of the “mixed tariff” on textiles, which had been relatively effective in preventing imports of products that were “under-invoiced” in order to avoid tax duties, according to Fabricato.

“With the termination of this [mixed] tariff modality, replaced by a model that only considers a percentage on the value of the imported product, some gaps emerged that facilitated the increase of unfair [textile and clothing import] practices, such as price declarations or product specifications that do not correspond to what is really important,” according to the company. “In order to combat this imbalance, the government is working with the private sector to prepare a decree that should be enacted shortly and that should set reference prices to avoid importing products with ostensibly low prices.”

In addition to under-invoiced imports, “there is an increase in the importation of products with prices below reasonable international costs, which characterizes ‘dumping,” according to Fabricato.

“In this case, to prove this unfair practice and take restrictive measures, the [remedy] process is longer and more complex. However, Fabricato and [fellow Medellin-based textile maker] Coltejer jointly initiated an anti-dumping process against denim fabrics of Chinese origin. This process should receive a first response from local authorities this year, and if accepted in all instances, could result in effective measures in favor of domestic producers in the first half of next year,” according to the company.

“In addition to the unfair practices mentioned above, Colombia is the country with the lowest textile tariffs [10%] when compared with countries such as Argentina (26%), Brazil (26%) and Mexico, which varies from 10% to 20%.

“Due to the ease of legal importation, unfair dumping and under-invoicing practices, what was noted on the supply side was a disproportionately high increase, while on the demand side, as we have already said, we have noticed a contraction. As a natural result of this combination of factors, an increase in inventory levels was perceived.

“With so much negative news and misinformation generated by some unions in the [textile] sector, financial institutions and insurers perceived an increase in the perception of risk, with the consequent credit restriction and increase in credit insurance premiums, in addition to the reduction in credit quotas.

“Even in the case of small or medium-sized companies, which are not financed through the financial system but through credits with the importing/distributing companies, credit was affected,” Fabricato concluded.

Written by October 28 2017 0

Medellin-based banking giant Bancolombia – Colombia’s biggest bank and now a growing multinational – reported October 26 that its third quarter (3Q) 2017 net profit dipped 1% year-on-year, to COP$1.7 trillion (US$564 million).

However, Bancolombia’s gross portfolio grew 6.5% year-on-year to COP$158 trillion (US$52 billion), of which 25% corresponds to its international operations including Banistmo (Panama), Banco Agrícola (El Salvador) and BAM (Guatemala).

The ratio of 90-day past-due loans rose to 2.9%, up from 2.0% in 3Q 2016. But provisions for this portfolio are 161%, which “guarantees solidity in the midst of a challenging environment,” according to the company.

“Recognizing the current economic outlook, the bank continues its growth path,” added Bancolombia president Juan Carlos Mora. However, “provisions charges were increased in order to maintain a prudent coverage index and keep the balance-sheet solid,” Mora said.

As of September 2017, Bancolombia Group had 9,707 correspondent banking outlets, 5,504 ATMs, and reported 6.8 million downloads of its “App People” banking application as well as 50,000 “App Companies” users.

“The growth in these channels makes it more efficient for more people and companies to access the financial system in all the geographies in which Bancolombia is present,” according to the company.

Another highlight was the growth in international capital markets, according to the company. For example, Banistmo achieved placements in the international bond market of US$500 million, with bond-buyer demand exceeding bond supply by 450%. “With this issue, the four banks of the Group have already successfully entered the international capital markets, managing to diversify their funding structure,” according to the company.

In addition, “Bancolombia Group has enough capital to face the challenges of the coming years. Primary capital reached 10.3%, which represents more than twice the minimum required. Likewise, solvency [ratio] was 13.4%,” according to the company.

In a subsequent October 27 conference call with investment analysts, Bancolombia chief economist Juan Pablo Espinosa added that Colombia’s economic growth this year continues to be sluggish, with year-on-year GDP seen rising by only 1.9%.

However, productivity is expected to rise, and when combined with improved global demand and likely reductions in central bank interest rates, full-year 2018 GDP is seen rising by 2.5%, he said.

Full-year 2017 inflation is now seen at 4%, while full-year 2018 inflation is likely to dip to 3.5%, he added.

Colombian exports are forecast to grow by 20% this year and another 5% next year thanks to the relatively strong U.S. dollar versus the Colombian peso, combined with recoveries in global demand.

While the national government is likely to meet its fiscal deficit target of 3.6% of GDP this year, the government will need to take more austerity steps in 2018 -- and achieve more reforms in 2019 in order to keep fiscal deficits in check, he cautioned.

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About Medellin Herald

Medellin Herald is a locally produced, English-language news and advisory service uniquely focused upon a more-mature audience of visitors, investors, conference and trade-show attendees, property buyers, expats, retirees, volunteers and nature lovers.

U.S. native Roberto Peckham, who founded Medellin Herald in 2015, has been residing in metro Medellin since 2005 and has traveled regularly and extensively throughout Colombia since 1981.

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