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Written by November 20 2017 0

Colombia’s corporate oversight agency (Superintendencia de Sociedades) announced November 17 that Medellin-based architectural engineering giant Arquitectos e Ingenieros Asociados (AIA) filed for bankruptcy reorganization because of likely delays in paying creditors next year.

According to the Superintendencia, AIA reported revenues of COP$179 billion (US$59.6 million) at year-end 2016 and net income of COP$8.796 billion (US$2.9 million).

“The company requested the reorganization process, invoking the inability to pay imminently,” according to the Superintendencia. “That is, the company’s own projections suggest that it could stop paying its obligations next year.”

Superintendencia director Francisco Reyes Villamizar pointed out that AIA is one of Colombia’s most famous architectural engineers and construction companies, having participated in major infrastructure works such as the Bogota-Villavicencio superhighway and Medellin’s inconic María Luisa Calle cycling stadium, among many other big projects.

“The objective of the reorganization is to preserve the company as a productive unit and a source of employment generation,” Reyes added.

“Among the causes of the business crisis is a lower-than-expected behavior of the [Colombian construction] sector and a lack of working capital,” according to the Superintendencia.

“Upon admission to the insolvency regime, the company must refrain from making patrimony transfers that are not included in the ordinary course of business or making payments or arrangements outside the process,” the agency added.

Written by November 17 2017 0

Medellin-based multinational personal-hygiene products maker Grupo Familia announced November 15 that its third quarter (3Q) 2017 net profit dipped to COP$44 billion (US$14.6 million), down from CP$51 billion (US$16.9 million) in 3Q 2017.

However, for the first nine months of 2017, Familia’s net profit has more than tripled, to COP$159 billion (US$52.8 million), compared to COP$41 billion (US$13.6 million) in the first nine months of 2016.

Sales in 3Q 2017 rose slightly year-on-year, to COP$579 billion (US$192 million), while taxes also rose in the latest quarter, to COP$24 billion (US$7.9 million), from COP$19.9 billion (US$6.6 million) in 3Q 2016.

Familia – founded in 1958 as a family company – operates in 23 countries in Latin America, with four manufacturing plants in Colombia, one in Ecuador, one in Argentina and one in the Dominican Republic.

Its brand names include “Familia,” “Pequeñin,” “Petys,” “Nosotras,” “Pomys” and “Tena.” Product lines include toilet paper, facial tissues, diapers, feminine hygiene products, creams, shampoos, pet-cleaning products and industrial hygiene products.

Written by November 16 2017 0

Medellin-based insurance and pension-fund giant Grupo Sura announced November 15 that its third quarter (3Q) 2017 net income fell 11.6% year-on-year, to COP$460 billion (US$152 million).

For the January-through-September nine months 2017, net income fell 26.6% year-on-year, to COP$1 trillion (US$331 million).

The decline came “mainly due to a negative impact of the [Colombian peso/U.S. dollar] exchange rate as well as non-recurring provisions recorded during the first half of the year,” according to Sura.

“Were we not to take into account the aforementioned effects, the parent´s net income would have dropped by just 0.3% based on the levels of operating performance obtained by its subsidiaries and the amount of revenues obtained from associates via the equity method.

“Nevertheless, our subsidiaries continue to secure significant levels of growth thereby reinforcing their competitive standing in all those countries in the region where we are present while maintaining positive levels of operating performance in the core lines of business,” according to the company.

The Suramericana insurance division saw earnings before taxes rise 3.5% year-on-year “thanks to a good level of performance from its regional operations as well as higher contributions from all those businesses acquired from RSA, which are now offsetting the increase in interest expense and amortizations incurred with this acquisition” according to Sura.

However, Suramericana’s net income fell 9.4% year-on-year, to COP$393 billion (US$130 million), “mainly due to higher income tax,” according to the company.

At the end of 3Q 2017, Grupo SURA’s consolidated financial liabilities rose 5% year-on-year, to COP$10.2 trillion (US$3.3 billion), including a US$191 billion bond placement in February 2017 as well as a separate US$350 million issue of international bonds (for Sura AM division) in April 2017, “for the purpose of replacing its liabilities and improving their maturity structure,” according to Sura.

The corporate segment, as recorded in Grupo Sura´s consolidated income, includes Grupo Sura, Suramericana and Sura AM. “This segment includes the amortizations relating to the acquisition of the former ING operations, which in no way affect cash,” according to the company.

However, this consolidated statement “does not include the amortizations carried out with regard to the acquisition of the former RSA companies, since these are directly posted in the non-life segment. The main changes to this segment for this past quarter consist mainly of the effect of the exchange rate on the dollar-denominated debt carried as well as the derivatives held by Grupo Sura and SuraA AM to hedge said debt,” according to the company.

Insurance premiums for 3Q 2017 rose by 8.8% “thanks to the level of performance secured by the different segments throughout the region, with life insurance accounting for more than half of this increase,” according to Sura.

“Likewise, the auto [insurance] solution continues with its good dynamics in the region, driven by the signature in September of a new agreement with UBER in Mexico,” the company added.

Completes Mexico Internal Swap Deal

Also on November 15, Sura announced that the Suramericana insurance division completed the buyout of the Mexican life-insurance portfolio formerly belonging to Sura Asset Management.

“Suramericana, with 73 years of experience in the insurance industry, shall be extending its portfolio to cover the aforementioned insurance interests held in Mexico,” according to the company.

Written by November 16 2017 0

Medellin-based multinational supermarket giant Grupo Exito reported November 14 that its net loss for third quarter (3Q) 2017 came in at COP$31 billion (US$10 million), a big improvement over the 3Q 2016 net loss of COP$100 billion (US$33 million).

Net revenues grew 8.5% year-on-year, to COP$13.9 trillion (US$4.6 billion), while gross profit improved 5.3%, to COP$3.1 trillion (US$1 billion).

Recurring earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) rose 5.5% year-on-year, to COP$670 billion (US$222 million), according to the company.

For first the nine months of 2017, net income rose to COP$30 billion (US$9.9 million), up sharply from a net loss of COP$148 billion (US$49 million) for the first nine months of 2016, the company reported.

The company’s expansion beyond Colombia into Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina is paying-off, with system-wide synergies now expected to deliver more than US$50 million in savings, according to Exito.

“The results in third-quarter 2017 keep us confident about the strategy followed on each of the countries in where the company operates,” said Exito CEO Carlos Mario Giraldo.

“In Brazil, we highlight the positive figures and growth of the food business through ‘Assaí,’ ‘Extra’ and ‘Pão de Açúcar’ [store brands].

“In Colombia, the expansion of ‘Surtimayorista,’ the innovation with ‘Carulla Fresh Market’ and the cost-cutting strategies will create differentiation in the long-run.

“In Uruguay, the convenience format with ‘Devoto Express’ continues as a strong contributor to results, and in Argentina, we see evidence of economic recovery and a real estate business that continues to contribute to the results,” Giraldo added.

The Latin America integration strategy includes “18 initiatives across the four countries, mainly related to the launch of a renewed loyalty program in Brazil, the exchange of best practices between Colombia and Brazil in supply chain to reduce shrinkage in perishables, and other synergies derived from the ongoing integration process between countries,” according to Exito.

“The gradual decrease of interest rates in Colombia and Brazil may lower financial expenses and trigger consumption levels,” while Exito also expects a “mid-term economic recovery in Colombia, Brazil and Argentina.”

Meanwhile, the company will focus upon "cost and expense control activities” and maintain an “expansion focus on high-return formats such as cash-and-carry in Brazil and Colombia.”

Exito also foresees a “high potential from store conversions and renovations of premium stores,” according to the company.

In Colombia, Exito forecasts that its capex spending this year will hit about COP$300 billion (US$99 million). Strategic priorities in Colombia include “focusing on cost and expense control activities and in profitable expansion to maintain profitability” as well as “strengthening the differentiation of textiles, the ‘fresh’ model from' Super Inter,' and private-label penetration to defend the company’s market positioning and to improve sales volumes in the country.”

A recently announced “Puntos Colombia” loyalty program “may improve the company’s strength for traffic monetization in the near future,” the company added.

In Colombia, Exito this year plans to open “25 to 30 stores in profitable formats, mainly in mid-sized cities to avoid cannibalization, including eight cash-and-carry stores, for a sales expansion of nearly 35,000 square meters,” according to the company.

As for real estate projects, “expansion of Viva Malls will represent an additional 120,000 square meters of [retail leased space] in 2018,” according to the company.

In Brazil, strategic priorities this year include opening five new “Assaí” stores and converting 15 other stores to this format.

Another 40 Brazil stores will continue to adapt the “Colombian textile business model,” while recurring EBITDA margin will rise to about 5.5% in the food segment, “derived from higher profitability in ‘Assaí’ and stability in ‘Multivarejo,’” according to Exito.

In Uruguay, Exito plans to add another 10 to 15 “Devoto Express” stores this year, while in Argentina, strategic priorities include adding another 35.000 square meters of leased retail space over the next two-to-three years, according to the company.

Written by November 16 2017 0

Medellin-based construction giant Construcciones El Condor reported November 14 that its third quarter (3Q) 2017 net income nearly doubled year-on-year, to COP$15 billion (US$4.9 million), from COP$8 billion (US$2.6 million) in 3Q 2016.

Operating income also jumped in the latest quarter, to COP$262 billion (US$87 million), from COP$163 billion (US$54 million) in 3Q 2016. The company credited gains from the sale of its interest in the Opain airport concessionaire to Grupo Argos for part of the improved results.

Conconcreto Results Dip

Meanwhile, Medellin-based highway construction specialist Conconcreto reported November 15 that its 3Q 2017 net income fell 46.6% year-on-year, to COP$33 billion (US$10.9 million), while earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) fell 18.9%, to COP$127 billion (US$42 million).

The downturn for Conconcreto reflected slower growth in the Colombian economy this year, resulting in construction slowdowns, according to the company.

Meanwhile, Conconcreto reported a construction order backlog with a total value of COP$2.59 trillion (US$859 million), equivalent to 2.4-years of work.

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About Medellin Herald

Medellin Herald is a locally produced, English-language news and advisory service uniquely focused upon a more-mature audience of visitors, investors, conference and trade-show attendees, property buyers, expats, retirees, volunteers and nature lovers.

U.S. native Roberto Peckham, who founded Medellin Herald in 2015, has been residing in metro Medellin since 2005 and has traveled regularly and extensively throughout Colombia since 1981.

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