Friday, November 22, 2019

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Infrastructure 17

Colombia’s national highway agency (Invias) announced November 19 that the Medellin-Bogota highway – blocked by a November 13 landslide at kilometer 73 (San Luis, Antioquia) -- likely will be cleared by next weekend (around November 24).

Heavy rains had caused the massive landslide, blocking both lanes of the highway and forcing traffic to take longer and heavily-congested alternative routes.

As of 6 p.m. November 19, about 70% of the more than 52,000 cubic meters of dirt and rocks had been removed from the highway, according to Invias operations director Juan Esteban Romero.

In total, 70 pieces of heavy equipment including backhoes, dump trucks and bulldozers are working to clear the site and unblock the adjacent “La Leticia” stream crushed by the landslide. One motorist was killed in the landslide incident, but no other fatalities or injuries have since been reported.

The removed dirt and rocks have been transported to the municipality of San Luis for reuse on tertiary rural roads, according to Invias.


Medellin’s “Plaza Mayor” on November 14 unveiled a COP$32 billion (US$9.4 million) expansion plan that over the next 10 years would modernize a host of convention facilities and add a new hotel.

The “2019-2029 Events with a Future” scheme includes 10 proposals both within and outside the convention center, along with “modernization of spaces and extension of complementary services,” according to Plaza Mayor, which is owned by the City of Medellin.

A new tower would be built over the current parking lot at the Yellow Pavilion, incorporating a 200-room hotel, co-working spaces and office spaces.

The tower also would offer “small- and medium-sized salons and other services such as restaurants, spa, beauty salon and commerce,” according to the organization.

Plaza Mayor general manager Juliana Cardona Quirós pointed out that the additions and upgrades would capitalize on Medellin’s growing global event-marketing successes, with the city having hosted more than 371 international events in just the last four years.

As a result, Plaza Mayor would extend its offer of convention services to other areas of the city.

At Plaza Mayor, projects would include expansion and adaptation of annexed areas at the Yellow Pavilion, relocating the garbage-recycling zone and making the Blue Pavilion independent.

The scheme also includes developing “pleasant spaces for rest, work and meetings, to ensure comfort and connectivity for our visitors,” according to the organization.

A new electronic signaling system would help visitors orient themselves around the various spaces, while a new “Innovation Center” aims to boost business tourism.

A new food area would replace the existing area “providing more and better offers for customers and visitors,” according to Plaza Mayor.

The scheme also includes creation of a single event-ticket window (replacing multiple sites) for greater customer convenience, as well as storage lockers and improved connectivity.


Colombia’s Agencia Nacional de Infraestructura (ANI, the national infrastructure agency) announced October 2 that the crucial “Vias del Nus” connecting Medellin’s northern suburbs to Atlantic ports will open for traffic by end-2020.

The 157.4-kilometers-long project includes 24.3 kilometers of four-lane divided highway, the twin-tube “Túnel de la Quiebra” tunnels, rehabilitation of 35.6 kilometers of two-lane highway between Cisneros and Alto Dolores, construction of a third lane along 2.7 kilometers of highway between San José del Nus and Alto Dolores and the construction of 15 bridges, according to ANI.

Once opened, “Vias del Nus” will become “ the main cargo outlet from Medellín to the ports of the Caribbean Coast,” according to ANI.

The new, COP$515.6 billion (US$149 million) tunnels will enable traffic to pass beneath the heretofore problematic Alto de la Quiebra mountain in just 10 minutes -- compared to the tortuous, 40-minutes-long climb-and-descent on the existing road.

Currently, the average traffic on the “Vias del Nus” corridor is 2,000 vehicles daily. But once the new highway is in operation, average daily traffic is expected to increase to around 17,000 vehicles, greatly improving freight movements between Medellin and the Atlantic with average vehicle speeds of about 80 kilometers per hour, according to ANI.

Each tube of the "Tunel de la Quiebra" will be 4.2 kilometers long, requiring excavation of tough batholitic rock. Linear progress is about 600 meters per month, with 7,500 meters of a total of 8,400 meters already excavated, according to ANI. 


Medellin-based power giant EPM on September 27 gave journalists a first public tour of the start of recovery work in the damaged machine room of the US$5 billion, 2.4-gigawatt “Hidroituango” hydroelectric project in Antioquia.

Having already reached crucial milestones including completion of the engineered spillway, raising the dam to its final height and draining water from the damaged machine room, EPM will by end-October 2019 open a new highway at the top of the dam -- bringing convenient mobility to residents in towns near the dam including the municipality of Ituango, according to the company.

At the same time, the company continues to make progress toward final installation of a second, crucial water-closure gate for the auxiliary diversion tunnel (GAD in Spanish initials), whose collapse last year forced temporary diversion of Cauca River water through the machine room, causing hundreds of millions of dollars of losses due to lost power revenues and infrastructure damages.

Meanwhile, opening of the main access tunnel to the machine room has now been completed, enabling heavy machinery to enter for repair work, according to EPM.

“To date, 80% of the caverns around the machinery, transformers, beacons and adjacent tunnels have been cleared,” according to EPM.

“Civil-works damage to infrastructure has been found in 20% of these inspected areas. As of December 31 of this year, we expect to have 100% of the complex of caves inspected and damages calculated, in order to continue with repairs.”

A nearby technical monitoring center meanwhile enables real-time evaluation of the behavior of the dam and the other works of the project.

“Currently the indicators show that the works and the rock massif [adjacent to the dam] are stable,” according to EPM. “All the typical leaks found in such projects are evaluated permanently and to date all remain within the ranges contemplated in the project design.”

The company continues to expect that initial power production from Hidroituango will start by end-2021, then gradually expand until reaching its full 2.4-gigawatts output capacity by 2024.

According to EPM, among the project’s enormous fiscal and environment benefits include:

Emissions reductions of the order of 4.4 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year -- 94% of the goal of Colombia’s entire electricity sector by 2030. “This represents a significant contribution to meeting the goals of Colombia in the commitments of COP21 [Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change],” according to EPM.

“It will deliver about COP$85 billion (US$24.6 million) each year for transfers to Colombia’s regional environmental agencies [such as Corantioquia and Cornare in Antioquia] and 153 municipalities, including those in the area of the dam’s influence, which includes the Cauca River basin.

“Additionally, via regional taxes and other contributions to other entities, the project will generate approximately COP$10 billion (US$2.9 million) per year. During the operational life of the project, resources will be generated of the order of COP$8 trillion (US$2.3 billion).

“Colombia will receive national income taxes of approximately COP$240 billion (US$69 million) annually, which will correspond during the operation of the project in resources for the nation totalling about COP$18 trillion (US$5.2 billion).

“The project includes compensation and recovery of about 19,000 hectares of tropical dry forest and tropical rainforest in the 12 municipalities of the area of influence, which becomes an opportunity for [protection of] biodiversity of the territory.

“Within the framework of the environmental and social management plan and regarding connectivity, about COP$1.9 trillion (US$550 million) have been invested in the 12 municipalities in the area of influence, which has resulted in a valuable contribution to the progress of its inhabitants and to the transformation of a territory that has historically suffered from national government abandonment and violence by of illegal armed groups.”

Once in operation, “the energy supply from the project will allow a reduction close to 30% in the [national] cost of power during its first five years of operation,” according to the company.

In addition, “power generation from Hidroituango -- interconnected to the Caribbean coast -- will enable a more-than-20% reduction in power costs paid by users of the current thermoelectric power in that region.”

National power reliability also will improve -- without causing an increase of global-warming emissions that result from “firm” power plants running on coal, oil or natural gas, the company noted.

Hidroituango has a firm energy output capacity of 5,708 gigawatt-hours per year – “energy that can be produced even in the worst drought in history,” according to EPM, and without any CO2 emissions.

If not for Hidroituango, Colombia otherwise would need to build another750-MW thermal power plant to ensure reliable, 24 hours/day power-- with a consequent carbon footprint that would violate Colombia’s commitment to meeting CO2-reduction goals under the COP21 agreement, the company added.

What’s more, because “green” solar or wind power are only intermittent – they don’t work when the sun isn’t shining and when the wind isn’t blowing -- Hidroituango’s constant 2.4-gigawatts power capacity is equivalent to installing about 5 gigawatts wind power or 3.8 gigawatts of solar energy, EPM added.


Medellin-based electric power giant EPM on September 25 issued a bulletin pointing out that nothing in the latest Colombian Controller General’s report about the US$5 billion “Hidroituango” hydroelectric project in Antioquia finds any instances of corruption.

Nor does the Controller’s report point to any criminal or disciplinary actions that would result from the April 2018 collapse of a diversion tunnel that has forced a three-year delay in power sales from Hidroituango, along with many millions of dollars in infrastructure damage.

As for the Controller’s findings that the tunnel collapse is likely to cost EPM roughly US$569 million in lost sales and infrastructure recovery -- and possibly as much as COP$2.9 trillion (US$852 million) in loss of net present value – those calculations remain hypothetical, according to EPM.

“For legal reasons in the fiscal responsibility process, EPM explanations can only be delivered to [the Controller General] later; that is, during the fiscal investigation process. The company is convinced that, by that time, it will resolve satisfactorily all the doubts and concerns contained in the report,” according to EPM.

“Regarding the recognition of the costs derived from the contingency, it is necessary to wait until the amount [of insurance coverage] that the insurer will recognize and the corresponding schedule of insurance payments, which, as EPM reported [last week] will result from a rigorous analysis of the quantification of damages according to the conditions established in the policy.

“The company will promptly inform the nation of the results when the disbursed [insurance payment] resources enter EPM and go into the financial statements of the project.

“The [Hidroituango] works have met the technical specifications, construction plans and construction programs using technical rigor and administrative measures that are demanded of a megaproject of this size.

“In fact, at the time of the April 28, 2018 [tunnel collapse] contingency, project execution was on-schedule and within the estimated budget.

“The Hidroituango hydroelectric project remains technically viable and financially. It is indispensable for the energy security of Colombia and, just as important, has a note of insurance coverage issued by insurance company Mapfre [as noted last week] based, among other considerations, on not having evidence of negligence or malintention during construction of the project.

“For EPM, Hidroituango is a crucial infrastructure project for the development of the country. Its entry into commercial operation, which according to the current forecast will be a at the end of 2021, will generate 17% of the country’s energy, with clean, reliable, safe and low-cost technology, and will bring multiple benefits for Colombians.”

What The Report Actually Said

Colombia’s Controller General on September 20 first unveiled a report that questioned management decisions by EPM during construction of the Hidroituango plant. Those decisions ultimately could cost EPM at least US$246 million in infrastructure damages and another US$323 million in lost power sales, accodring to the report.

However, the actual costs of physical damage could rise by another COP$423 billion (US$124 million) if EPM ultimately discovers more damages to machinery and equipment, the report cautions.

“In addition, there are some [cost issues] whose amount is yet to be determined, such as the repair of cavities, the fracturing of rock, the installed steel shields, the civil works in the machine room and additional elements to be written off,” according to the report.

On the other hand, the Controller’s report fails to include trillions of pesos of damage-coverages that EPM now expects to recover following a decision by insurance giant Mapfre (see September 17, 2019 Medellin Herald).

Bottom line: Hidroituango’s actual infrastructure-damage and power-sales losses – covered by insurance – presumably could be excluded from the Controller’s current net-present-value calculations, now estimated at a negative COP$2.9 trillion (US$852 million).

One curious figure in the Controller’s report finds that EPM spent an extra COP$484 billion (US$142 million) to accelerate completion of the dam and the engineered spillway in the wake of a diversion-tunnel collapse last year. That tunnel collapse forced EPM to divert Cauca River water through the machine room in order to avoid a catastrophic dam collapse.

However, since EPM was going to continue building the dam and spillway in any case, it’s unclear how much of that US$142 million would have been spent no matter the impact of the tunnel-collapse contingency.

Another puzzling item in the report states that the Controller partly based its findings upon a heretofore-secret Universidad Nacional study on financial impacts of the tunnel collapse. But EPM has noted publicly thatt it had never seen this study and hence hadn’t been able to respond to its supposed conclusions.

According to the text of the Controller’s report, “one of the decisions taken by EPM that had the greatest impact on the project was the non-construction of the guides for the closing gates of the diversion tunnels.”

In addition, “the construction of the auxiliary diversion gallery [the water diversion tunnel that later collapsed] was contrary to the recommendations of the EPM Advisory Board, which always pointed out the need to conform to the original designs,” according to the Controller's report.

“On repeated occasions, the EPM Advisory Board expressed its disagreement with the so-called ‘Acceleration Plan’ and the construction of the Auxiliary Deviation Gallery [diversion tunnel], indicating that ‘the technical risks associated with acceleration are not acceptable for a project of this magnitude’ and, in addition, ‘there is still uncertainty that the multiple and delicate tasks remaining to achieve the diversion are executed in a timely manner.’

“The Board of Advisers always recommended adjusting [the project] to the original design [for diverting the Cauca River] in the first half of 2014 and, if necessary, recover [project construction] time by speeding up the construction of the dam, which was an alternative with much less risk than the acceleration of the diversion tunnel,” according to the Controller’s report.

Four years prior to the tunnel collapse, EPM had fallen behind in the original construction schedule, the report noted.

To compensate, EPM decided to invest about COP$1 trillion [US$293 million] in alternative measures aiming to recoup lost time and hence ensure timely capture of future planned electric-power sales. But when the diversion tunnel collapsed, those alternative measures turned into a costly failure, the Controller noted.

As a result, “the consolidated loss of profit from the project is estimated at COP$1.1 trillion [US$323 million]; and a presumed detriment to public equity was established at COP$2.9 trillion [US$852 million], corresponding to what is estimated as the destruction of value due to the greater investments made without entering into [timely] operation,” according to the Controller.

Prior to issuing the report, the Controller’s audit of the Hidroituango project took place between March 4 to July 17, 2019, involving “a multidisciplinary team of auditors composed of lawyers, civil and systems engineers, economists, accountants and geologists, among other professions, and all with more 15 years of association with the Controller,” according to the agency.

“Projects such as Hidroituango must comply with high design and construction standards, given the social, environmental and economic impact they produce, but the Comptroller's conclusion is that this has not been the case,” according to the report.

“There are weaknesses in the [engineering] technical studies both in initial logistics works, as well as in the main works, which resulted in modifications to the contracts due to larger amounts of works, inclusion of new items, redesigns and changes in construction techniques, which generated more time and costs for the project,” according to the report.

In addition, “EPM's economic valuation of the project currently contemplates that in subsequent years it will recover, through insurance policies, [physical] damages and lost profits that, if not received, will affect negatively the economic expectations that are had on the project in the medium and long term,” the report concludes.

 


Medellin-based electric power giant EPM announced August 15 that local leaders from communities around Puerto Valdivia, Antioquia are now participating in a broad government/citizen/EPM expert panel examining possible stability issues with the main rock massif adjacent to the giant Hidroituango hydroelectric dam in Antioquia.

The decision to include the “MEDAV” (Mesa de Dialogos y Acuerdos-Afectados por Hidroituango, Valdivia) leadership group came following an August 10 letter from MEDAV to a Colombian court judge charged with overseeing the multiparty panel now studying the Hidroituango stability issue.

In its letter, the MEDAV group pointed out to the judge that the left-wing political organization “Rios Vivos” – a current member of the multi-party study panel -- fails to represent the affected Valdivia community and “hasn’t made any positive contribution to solving the problems generated” by the May 2018 collapse of a Hidroituango diversion tunnel.

That tunnel collapse last year triggered a flood that temporarily forced evacuation of many homes in Valdivia downstream of the dam.

“Rios Vivos” has fought the Hidroituango hydroelectric project since its inception -- and publicly calls for the dam’s destruction now, no matter whether it would operate safely, and no matter that such a destruction would cost Antioquia untold billions of dollars in future public revenue via the production of zero-emissions, clean electricity for all Colombian citizens.

Instead, Rios Vivos “has dedicated itself to creating panic and delaying the process of bringing about positive solutions for our community,” according to MEDAV.

Since the Hidroituango dam has now been completed, and since the Cauca River is now safely flowing over the dam’s engineered spillway, Valdivia residents are gradually returning to homes previously evacuated.

“Persons and families that suffered from the [sudden, temporary flooding that resulted from the diversion tunnel collapse in May 2018] don’t consider themselves ‘victims’ of Hidroituango, but rather ‘temporary casualties’ affected by the [temporary flooding] -- and we value the efforts by EPM to repair all the damages caused,” according to the MEDAV letter.

“Contrary to what ‘Rios Vivos’ claims, the communities around Puerto Valdivia have built relations of trust with EPM, because this company has kept us informed about the measures they have taken to repair the damages and to minimize the risks of the project. In addition, EPM has complied with the commitments they have assumed to help those affected,” the letter concludes.

In an August 15 press bulletin, EPM added that the technical panel has now met six times, with a seventh meeting scheduled August 28 and a site visit scheduled for September 2-3.

The panel eventually aims to produce a technical study analyzing the stability of the rock massif adjacent to the dam -- in order to decide whether the Hidroituango project should continue to move forward.

The US$5 billion Hidroituango project is scheduled to start producing power in late 2021, then reach its full 2.4-gigawatts capacity in 2024 -- providing 17% of the entire Colombian electric power output.


After decades of delays, a new, COP$1.1 trillion (US$317 million), 24-kilometers-long highway -- including Colombia’s longest tunnel – on August 15 opened to link Medellin directly to the Jose Maria Cordoba (JMC) international airport at Rionegro.

According to Concesion Tunel Aburra-Oriente (CTAO, the project consortium involving 74 companies), the new highway -- including two long tunnels, one short tunnel and nine viaducts -- would cut travel time from Medellin to JMC to 18 minutes, compared to 45 minutes currently.

The route also will cut other personal transit times to and from Medellin and the rapidly growing “oriente” (east of Medellin) region. Drawn to its pleasurably cooler climate, cleaner air and more wide-open spaces, Medellin residents are increasingly moving east into thousands of new “oriente” homes and businesses every year, toward what locals dub “Medellin’s second floor.”

“The Aburrá-Oriente Road Connection is a mega-project that connects the Aburrá Valley Metropolitan Area with the San Nicolás Valley -- two regions of great importance for our [Antioquia] department, including large-scale industrial, tourist, environmental and mobility dynamics,” according to CTAO.

“Starting in Medellín, in the Baltimore sector of the Las Palmas highway, a new road interchange allows access to the first tunnel, with a length of 774 meters.

“After this tunnel, there is an open-sky track in the east-central area of the Aburrá Valley, then comes a second tunnel of 8.2 kilometers in length.”

A parallel tunnel alongside the new tunnel has already been excavated in anticipation of converting the two-lane highway into four lanes -- divided for faster travel in both directions.

While some politicians and local residents historically had raised concerns that the tunnel might drain vital groundwater from local farms near the route, the CTAO consortium responded by employing the most advanced European tunnel-construction technologies, according to CTAO.

Beyond employing a special cement to prevent water escape into the tunnels, the consortium also installed 77 groundwater monitoring systems, according to CTAO.


The “Covipacifico” highway construction consortium announced August 14 that its engineers have begun initial work towards recovery of a 300-meters-long section of the crucial, under-construction “Pacifico 1” highway wiped out by a landslide last May.

The landslide not only destroyed the new section of highway but also wrecked a 300-meters-long section of existing highway below, blocking the traditional route between Medellin’s southern suburb of Caldas and the town of Bolombolo alongside the Cauca River.

As a result, freight traffic southwestward from Medellin toward the main Pacific port of Buenaventura has been forced to take lengthy and costly detours. Final resolution of the landslide problem is likely to take many more months.

“After the [land] mass movement that happened suddenly on May 28 that affected the existing road and the Pacifico 1 divided highway under construction, Covipacifico now works constantly and responsibly in the search for solutions that allow to recover mobility in the Sinifaná sector (PR 59 + 600 and PR 60 + 000) of Colombia Route 6003,” according to the consortium.

“Thanks to the best climatic and safety conditions that have occurred in the affected area in the last 15 days, it has been possible for specialist [engineers] to access the site in order to establish mitigation measures.

“Currently, Covipacifico through its construction contractor mobilizes the resources necessary to advance the actions recommended by the experts.

“Part of the approaches to be implemented [include] the construction of canals and drain structures for water management, critical [land-] mass management, implementation of deep drains in slopes and control structures at the top of the slope.

“Additionally, an early warning monitoring system will be implemented that will allow for timely reaction to any eventuality.

“The implementation and progress of this mitigation phase will define technical alternatives that enable removal and recomposition activities in the area, and thus seek to obtain a temporary, gradual and secure solution for [traffic] user mobility,” according to the consortium.



Colombia’s national infrastructure agency (Agencia Nacional de Infraestructura, ANI) announced July 31 that the 254-kilometers-long “Mar 2” highway project connecting Medellin to new Atlantic ports just won financial close.

According to ANI, the project got US$652 million in finance from three sources: China Development Bank (US$418 million), Sumitomo Mitsui Banking (US$84 million) and Colombia’s Financiera de Desarrollo Nacional (FDN) finance agency (US$150 million).

Colombia President Iván Duque announced the financing deal following a meeting in Beijing this week with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

“Mar 2” is the first “fourth generation” (4G) highway concession project in Colombia involving China Harbour Engineering Company, according to ANI.

Once “Mar 2” and the connecting “Mar 1” highways are complete, freight transport between Medellin and new ports in the Uraba region will be slashed to four hours, greatly improving the competitiveness of Medellin’s industrial and commercial sectors.

The Mar 2 project includes 54 bridges and 19 tunnels, and will make connections with several “4G’ highways as well as the under-construction “Toyo" tunnel west of Medellin, which will become Colombia’s longest tunnel -- and one of the largest in all South America..

‘Pacifico 1’ Tunnel Excavation Completed

On another front, the US$790 million “Pacifico 1” 4G highway project between Medellin’s southern suburb of Caldas and the Cauca River port town of Bolombolo just completed excavation of two parallel, 2.8-kilometers-long tunnels near Sinifaná in Antioquia.

Following the excavations, the next step is lining the tunnels with concrete and installing lighting, fire controls and emergency communications systems, according to ANI.

While completion of the “Sinifaná” tunnel excavation is a positive step forward, the same project suffered a reversal two months ago when heavy rains caused a landslide that wiped-out a 300-meters-long stretch of under-construction “Pacifico 1” highway as well as 300 meters of the existing highway below, temporarily blocking the most convenient route between Medellin and Bolombolo.

Restoration of the existing highway and reconstruction of the ruined section of new highway is expected to take many months, probably pushing-back the expected completion date of Pacifico 1.


Colombia’s national infrastructure agency (Agencia Nacional de Infraestructura, ANI) announced July 12, 2019 that the COP$110 billion (US$34 million) expansion of the cargo terminal at Medellin’s José María Córdova (JMC) international airport is nearly complete.

“The project awarded by ANI to the operator of Aeropuertos Centro Norte (Airplan) seeks via this extension to improve the logistics process of imports and exports, and reduce costs and transport times in this area of the country,” according to the agency .

The expansion works in the cargo terminal include adaptation of an administrative center, a cargo and warehousing service module, the extension of more than 33,000 square meters of taxiways and berms, the expansion of the platform that will expand from the current 14,000 square meters to more than 27,000 square meters and the construction of about 16,000 square meters of parking, according to ANI.

“Currently, this terminal serves the cargo transported by specialized airlines such as Avianca Cargo, Centurion Cargo, UPS, Aerosucre, Cargo Cup, Cargolux, Latam Cargo, Air Canada Cargo, Fedex and DHL as well as commercial passenger flights,” according to ANI.

“Among exportable products by air, flowers are considered the main transit through this terminal to destinations such as the United States, with the highest percentage of shipments, as well as to Japan, United Kingdom, Canada, the Netherlands, Spain and Russia.

“Among the new works was the adaptation of 3000 square meters of cold rooms that will allow a better management of [flower exports] and other loads, especially agricultural goods. It is estimated that, on average, flower shipments take between 11 and 16 hours from the initial harvesting to loading on the planes,” according to the agency.

Single Inspection Zone

Meanwhile, the new terminal also features one of the first single-cargo-inspection zones in all Colombia. This new area “seeks to implement new inspection procedures to streamline routine exercises carried out by entities such as the National Tax and Customs Directorate of Colombia (DIAN), the Anti-Narcotics police, the Invima (Colombia’s sanitary inspection regulatory agency) and the ICA (Colombia’s national agricultural research agency), according to ANI.

Passenger Traffic Jumps

On a related front, Grupo Aeroportuario del Sureste (GAdS) announced  July 3 that domestic passenger traffic through JMC airport from January through June 2019 is already up 19% year-on-year, totalling 4.7 million passengers. Meanwhile, international passenger traffic through JMC from January-June 2019 likewise is up 13% year-on-year, to 857,136 passengers.


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About Medellin Herald

Medellin Herald is a locally produced, English-language news and advisory service uniquely focused upon a more-mature audience of visitors, investors, conference and trade-show attendees, property buyers, expats, retirees, volunteers and nature lovers.

U.S. native Roberto Peckham, who founded Medellin Herald in 2015, has been residing in metro Medellin since 2005 and has traveled regularly and extensively throughout Colombia since 1981.

Medellin Herald welcomes your editorial contributions, comments and story-idea suggestions. Send us a message using the "contact" section.

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