Thursday, June 17, 2021

Become part of our community

captcha 

Medellin-based multinational utilities giant EPM announced October 29 that its third quarter (3Q) 2020 net income hit COP$1.3 trillion (US$337 million), up sharply from COP$457 billion (US$134 million) in 3Q 2019.

As for the first nine months of this year (January through September), EPM Group revenues are up 6%, to COP$14.1 trillion (US$3.65 billion), “thanks to the responsible management of finances and the diversification of the portfolio of services in six countries, which includes water supply; wastewater management; generation, distribution and transmission of energy; natural gas supply and solid waste management,” the company noted.

Nine-months 2020 operating income dipped 7% year-on-year, to COP$3.2 trillion (US$829 million), while earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) fell 4%, to COP$4.3 trillion (US$1.1 billion). EBTDA margin came-in at 31%.

“Of the COP$14.1 trillion [US$3.65 billion] of income achieved by the Group for the January-September period, EPM’s parent company contributed 51%, foreign affiliates 33% and national energy and water affiliates 16%,” according to EPM.

For full-year 2020,  EPM Group now estimates corporate profits between COP$2 trillion (US$518 million) to COP$2.4 trillion (US$622 million).

These estimates consider factors including “the coronavirus pandemic with its effect on the demand for public services and the payment of bills, the evolution of energy prices in the medium and long term, macroeconomics and the behavior of the exchange rate, as well as the incorporation of the new [Caribbean electric power] subsidiary Afinia to financial statements,” according to the company.

Covid-19 Impacts

Because of Colombian government decrees aiming to help families and businesses financially hurt by the Covid-19 shutdowns, EPM has had to absorb significant revenue cutbacks, the company noted.

Through the first nine months of 2020, EPM suffered revenue losses totaling almost COP$500 billion (US$130 million), “mainly due to lower revenues of COP$369 billion [US$95 million] and higher costs and expenses of COP$124 billion [US$32 million],” according to the company.

“The increases are in accounts-receivable (COP$269 billion/US$70 million); lower collections (COP$360 billion/US$93 million); discounts on timely payment (COP$19 billion/US$5 million) and freezes on financing installments (COP$31 billion/S$8 million),” according to EPM.

EPM finances also have been hurt by an exceptionally long drought season (through August this year) with resulting low hydrology in Colombia, impacting hydroelectric output.

“Another factor that weighed on results for the period was the lower demand for water, energy and natural gas associated with [reduced] economic activity, as a result of Covid-19,” according to EPM.

“In addition was the effect of a higher net accounting expense, excluding cash, due to an exchange difference of COP$748 billion (US$194 million), mainly caused by the restatement of debt in the U.S. dollars associated with the accumulated 18.36% devaluation of the Colombian peso.”

However, EPM has recouped COP$603 billion (US$156 million) of earlier exchange-rate losses recorded in March, “given the revaluation of the Colombian peso as of the second quarter of this year,” according to the company.

“Additionally, EPM has carried out actions in development of its foreign exchange risk hedging strategy that has allowed it to significantly improve its risk profile against currency volatility,” the company added.

Of the COP$1.49 trillion (US$389 million) budgeted for 2020  for profit transfers to the city of Medellin (its sole shareholder), EPM has already made payments of COP$1.3 trillion (US$337 million), the company added.

For the upcoming 2021 year, EPM estimates profit payments to the city of Medellín to be in the range of COP$1.1 trillion (US$285 million) to COP$1.3 trillion (US$337 million).

 At the end of September 2020, EPM reported total assets of COP$62.8 trillion (US$16.3 billion), up 14%, while liabilities rose 23%, to COP$37.9 trillion (US$9.8 billion). The debt/EBITDA ratio closed the third quarter at 4.41, compared to 3.80 in 2019.


Medellin Mayor Daniel Quintero, Antioquia Governor Anibal Gaviria, Colombia Health Minister Fernando Ruiz and Colombia President Ivan Duque jointly announced October 28 more measures to address surging Covid-19 cases in Antioquia and other parts of Colombia.

Beyond the upcoming bans on booze, bars and Halloween this weekend, upcoming curfews on children from 6 pm Friday, October 30 through 6 pm Monday, November 2 will also include curfews on adults from 10 pm until 6 am on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and until the dawn of Monday, November 2.

“During these days [and times], people may not circulate on the roads or in public spaces in the city,” Mayor Quintero stated.

“This Halloween cannot be normal. Costumes must worn be in the house, children must not go out. There will also be a restriction to avoid parties, not only in bars and restaurants, but even in homes, which is why a ‘dry law’ is put in place,” Quintero added.

The ban on booze sales for private or public consumption starts 6 pm Friday, October 30 and runs until the first minute of Tuesday, November 3.

“The objective in the department of Antioquia is to increase the installed capacity of Intensive Care Units [ICUs] to 1,400,” according to the Mayor’s Office. “The city of Medellín, to reach this goal, complies with ‘Plan Mil’ and as part of it will activate 176 beds that are already installed.”

“This goal of reaching 1,400 ICU beds is with the [Antioquia departmental] government, but the most important goal is that we do not have to use them,” Quintero added.

As of October 28, Medellín has 3,358 active Covid-19 cases, of which 230 are in ICUs, which represents 42% of total ICU capacity for all types of health problems.

Colombia Health Minister Urges Caution

However, Health Minister Fernando Ruiz added that Medellin and Antioquia department “are on a prolonged [Covid-19 case-load] plateau with a slight growth trend, which can generate a number of important problems, already expressed in an occupation of intensive care beds that is between 80% and 90%” department-wide.

To stem a hospital crisis, Antioquia has ordered limits on elective surgeries “to avoid excess-demand for intensive care” as well as “equipping ICU beds with equipment that is already in the territory, with which we can expand easily 180 more beds to be able to have a large availability within the city,” Minister Ruiz stated.

Beyond adding ICU beds, “we require the collaboration of the public to avoid all outbreaks of Covid-19. Social discipline is very important, solidarity among all,” Ruiz added.

President Duque Extends Current Restrictions

Meanwhile, Colombia President Ivan Duque announced in an October 28 nationally televised address that “greater control must be exercised over crowds” that are the main “super-spreaders” of Covid-19 outbreaks.

Citizens must take greater measures for “awareness, behavior, discipline and civic culture to prevail in order to have a good month of November with safe [economic] reactivation,” he said.

President Duque also cited a disturbing “second wave” of Covid-19 in Spain, France, Germany, the United Kingdom and other European countries, “which due to situations of severe outbreaks [governments] have had to take restrictive [quarantine] measures,” which Colombia must try to avoid.

“In the month of October we maintained the ‘selective isolation with responsible individual distancing’ [regulations] and today I have given very clear instructions to the Minister of Health, after having listened to all the experts, so that we issue a decree as of November 1, extending until November 30” the same, current regulations, he said.

Special emphasis will be placed on “exercising greater control over [crowd] agglomerations” while local authorities “will have to work hand in hand with the national government for this purpose,” he added.


Medellin-based multinational supermarket and home-products giant Grupo Exito announced October 28 that its third quarter (3Q) 2020 net profits jumped by 369% year-on-year, to COP$52 billion (US$13.5 million).

On the other hand, recurring earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) actually dipped 9.4% year-on-year, although sales rose a modest 2.4%.

Through the first nine months of 2020, net profits are COP$86 billion (US$22 million) -- a substantial improvement over the COP$19.5 billion (US$5 million) net loss for first nine months of 2019, according to the company.

The improved results “were leveraged especially by the positive performance of direct and electronic commerce channels in Colombia, which had a record growth of 250%, or 3.5-times the figure of the previous year, and by the good evolution of retail sales in Uruguay, which increased by 11.3%,” according to Exito.

Sales via electronic and direct commerce reached COP$1 trillion (US$259 million) in September, “a first in the history of Grupo Éxito or any other merchant in Colombia,” according to the company.

Colombia operations generated sales of COP$2.67 trillion (US$692 million), “even with the negative effect generated by mobility restrictions as a result of Covid-19,” according to Exito.

“Innovation continues to be a differential element. In Colombia, ‘Éxito Wow’ sales grew by 8.1% and ‘Carulla FreshMarket’ by 24%,” according to the company.

In Uruguay, sales grew 11.3% in local currency, “driven by the result of the electronic and direct commerce channels, as well as the ‘FreshMarket’ format, which had a sales growth of 11.7% and represented 41.7% of total sales in this country,” according to Exito.

“In Argentina, recurring EBITDA reached a positive margin of 1.9%, even in the midst of a complex macroeconomic environment and mobility restrictions,” the company added.

‘Sustainable Livestock’ Initiative

On another front, Grupo Éxito announced the launch of its “Sustainable Livestock” initiative.

“We are making progress in the consolidation of our sustainable livestock model, which has satellite-monitored the preservation of forests [surrounding] farms where the livestock that supplies the company are scattered in eight departments of [Colombia],” according to Exito.

“With this process, we have evaluated at 70% of our live cattle suppliers, and we expect to reach 100% of them by the end of the year.

“In November we will launch our ‘premium quality’ product that includes audit processes to guarantee a sustainable livestock process,” according to Exito.

Grupo Éxito ended 3Q 2020 with 630 stores: 515 in Colombia, 90 in Uruguay and 25 in Argentina, the company added.


Colombia-based Cemex LatAm Holdings on October 28 posted a US$109 million net loss for third quarter (3Q) 2020, worse than the US$4 million net loss in 3Q 2019.

The company attributed the net loss to “non-monetary impairment of intangible assets and assets in disuse.”

Cemex LatAm produces cement, concrete and aggregates in Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala.

Corporate-wide consolidated net sales for 3Q 2020 decreased 8% year-on-year, but earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) increased 19%.

EBITDA margin in 3Q 2020 increased 5.5 percentage points, “mainly due to higher cement prices as well as lower costs and selling and administrative expenses, despite lower volumes,” according to the company.

“Our cost savings program reached US$39 million [in the latest quarter] and it is expected to reach US$46 million dollars in total for 2020. We reduced our net debt by US$48 million and our leverage by 0.4 times to 3.7 times, from June to September.”

Commenting on the results, Cemex LatAm general manager Jesús González stated: “Our operations functioned relatively normally during the third quarter in Colombia, Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador, while [Covid-19] restrictions had an impact in Panama and to a lesser degree in Costa Rica.

“We continue to support our clients in some of the challenges they face due to Covid-19 through our ‘Cemex Te Acompaña’ program and our ‘Cemex Go’ digital platform. As a result of these actions, during the quarter we increased our Net-Promoter-Score by 19 points compared to the same period of the previous year.”

Colombia Results

EBITDA in Colombia rose 59% year-on-year, to US$28 million, while net sales increased 1% in comparable terms, reaching US$115 million, according to the company

Colombia cement sales volumes industry-wide “reached levels close to 2019 in 3Q 2020” while “our cement volumes increased 66% sequentially [from 2Q 2020] but decreased 6% compared to the same period last year, reflecting a new competitor and an impact from our price increases,” according to the company.

“Our quarterly cement prices were the highest since 2016; an increase of 2% sequentially and 8% compared to the same period last year."

In Colombia’s “fourth generation “ (4G) highway-construction sector, “4G projects continued apace. As of September, we have delivered, in cement and/or concrete, the equivalent of more than 420,000 cubic meters of concrete,” according to the company.

“In Bogotá, projects already awarded should start soon, including three hospitals, Transmilenio [bus rapid transit] extensions and a water treatment plant. The ‘Metro’ and the ‘Regiotram’ [rail mass-transit projects] should start cement consumption in 4Q 2021.

“For 2021, [Colombia’s national] investment budget for transportation is 36% higher compared to the previous year. In addition, cement consumption from 4G projects should peak and some 5G [next-generation highway] program projects could start,” according to Cemex LatAm.

In Colombia’s residential, industrial and commercial-construction sectors, “demand for cement in the self-construction sector recovered in June and this trend continued during 3Q 2020. Home sales recovered in 3Q 2020 increasing 2.8% compared to the same period last year,” according to the company.

“However, housing starts fell in the middle-double-digits. In the industrial and commercial sector, [Covid-19-caused] trends such as telecommuting, restricted travel and online shopping could reduce the demand for cement. However, it is encouraging that industrial and business confidence indices reached levels close to pre-pandemic levels in September,” the company added.

Elsewhere in Cemex LatAm markets, Panama sales dropped 64% year-on-year, while Costa Rica sales fell 12%. However, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala sales collectively rose 19% year-on-year, according to the company.


Area Metropolitana de Valle de Aburrá (AMVA) – the metro Medellin council of governments – announced October 26 that all local governments except Girardota will impose a curfew on minors (under 18) this Halloween holiday weekend -- 6 pm Friday, October 30 through midnight Monday, November 2-- and likewise ban all sales of liquor.

The move comes in response to a surge of Covid-19 cases locally and nationally, all caused by careless, ignorant or selfish groups of people who fail to wear face masks, fail to maintain minimum social distances and fail to conform to strict workplace, public-space and travel-space health protocols.

Restaurants, bars, clubs and casinos all must shut their doors by 10 pm each day during the long weekend, according to AMVA.

“In a meeting with the Colombia’s Vice Minister of Health Alexander Moscoso; the Governor of Antioquia Aníbal Gaviria Correa; the director of the Metropolitan Area Juan David Palacio Cardona, and the 10 mayors of the Aburrá Valley, following recommendations of the national government, it was decided to establish measures that increase control over the rise in Coronavirus cases in the department of Antioquia and which are concentrated to a greater extent in the municipalities of the [Medellin] metropolitan area,” according to AMVA.

“According to Health Vice-Minister Alexander Moscoso, the national government looks with concern at the increase in cases in Antioquia, and in particular in the Aburrá Valley, where ICUs [intensive care units] are at a high percentage of occupation, and if no measures are taken, the situation will tend to worsen in the region.”

The curfews and liquor restrictions “also avoid road accidents and fights that can further congest hospital units,” according to AMVA.

“The concern is that there is nowhere to attend [extra injured and sickened] people. And the contagion curve predicts that hospital occupancy will grow,” Moscoso warned.

According to the latest statistics from the departmental government, Antioquia recorded another 1,989 new cases of Covid-19 on October 26, with a cumulative total of 157,970 infections since tracking began last March.

Of the latest new cases, 994 are in Medellin, including 24 deaths, with the result that Medellin accounted for most of the 35 Covid-19 deaths yesterday department-wide.

Since tracking began in March, the cumulative number of deaths from Covid-19 in Antioquia now total 3,048.

Antioquia now has an ICU bed occupancy percentage of 81.22%, putting it above the “red-alert” trigger level of 80%.

“To date, there are 5,066 active cases in the Department – 2,840 in Medellin -- and the number of people recovered [since tracking began] is 149,559,” according to the Antioquia government. In all Antioquia, “there are 709 [Covid-19] hospitalized patients: 385 in ICUs and 324 in general hospitalization,” the government added.


Colombia’s national infrastructure agency (Agencia Nacional de Infraestructura, ANI) announced October 19 that the “Mar 1” highway project connecting Medellin westward to current and future Atlantic ports has jumped-ahead to 75% completion.

Meanwhile, the “Vias del Nus” highway project linking Medellin northward to the “Ruta del Sol” connection to Cartagena and Santa Marta is now 70% complete, according to ANI.

The “Mar 1” project includes construction of the second tube of Medellin's existing “Tunel al Occidente” tunnel (4.6 kilometers, due for completion by end-2022), as well as a new bridge over the Cauca river (426 meters), eventually connecting “ Mar 1” to the “Mar 2” highway -- including the new “Túnel del Toyo” (aka “Tunel Guillermo Gaviria Echeverri”) project, Colombia’s longest highway tunnel.

“Mar 1” has a total length of 181 kilometers, “connecting Medellín with the main commercial exchange centers such as the Caribbean Coast, the Pacific Coast and the Magdalena River,” according to ANI.

The COP$1.8 trillion (US$468 million) project includes 43 viaducts, including 18 completed, 23 in construction and two not-yet started.

“The Mar 1 and Mar 2 projects, together with the Pacific 1, 2, 3 toll roads, will facilitate foreign trade to and from the coffee region,” ANI vice president Carlos García said.

“Currently, the travel time in a truck from the coffee region to Urabá [Atlantic ports] is 21 hours, but with the construction of these projects it will be reduced to 12 hours,” García added.

Vías del Nus Update

Meanwhile, ANI reported October 9 that the COP$1.2 trillion (US$312 million) “Vías del Nus” highway project heading northward from Medellin is now 70% complete.

Another 40 kilometers of that highway has just opened, part of what eventually will stretch 156 kilometers, crossing the Magdalena River and joining with the “Ruta del Sol” highway to northern Caribbean ports.

The entire “Vías del Nus” project is now expected to be complete by first-half 2021, according to ANI. That highway will enable traffic speeds of 80 kilometers/hour and will slash travel times between Pradera (just north of Medellin) and Alto de Dolores (Antioquia).

A crucial section of “Vías del Nus” includes the COP$673 billion (US$175 million) twin-tube “La Quiebra” tunnels, eliminating an historic bottleneck that has snagged freight traffic between Medellin and northern Antioquia for more than 100 years. The “La Quiebra” tunnel project is now 76% complete, according to ANI.


Spain-based Air Europa announced October 19 that it will resume nonstop flights between Medellin’s Jose Maria Cordoba (MDE) international airport and Madrid (MAD), Spain.

“As of November, Air Europa resumes its flights to Bogotá, Medellín, Caracas and Havana and increases frequencies to Santo Domingo, Quito and Guayaquil,” according to the company.

By year-end 2020, Air Europa will have nonstop flights to 18 destinations in the Americas, according to the company.

Initially, nonstop flights to Medellin, Bogotá, Caracas and Havana will be once-a-week until passenger demand rises, enabling more flights, according to Air Europa. As a result, twice-a-week service is foreseen for Bogotá, Havana, Buenos Aires, Lima and Santa Cruz (Bolivia), according to the company.

Covid-19 Insurance Provisions

Via a new insurance policy through Allianz Partners, “the Air Europa customer will have medical and hospital expenses covered in the event of a possible Covid infection, as well as the cost that could arise from the extension of your hotel stay or, where appropriate, from the pertinent quarantine,” according to the company.

The new policy “includes medical transfer and repatriation, and the cancellation, in the case of not being able to fly due to contagion, up to the limit established in the policy," according to Air Europa.

In addition, Air Europa “allows a free date change on all reservations made,” according to the company.


Medellin Mayor Daniel Quintero on October 17 issued a startling analysis indicating that the Medellin metro area likely has already surpassed 1 million Covid-19 cases with 96% of those likely recovered.

According to the Mayor’s analysis (see: https://medellin.gov.co/irj/portal/medellin?NavigationTarget=navurl://96fe4145738006ecf074a9e8fc82bccc), “in some countries it has been shown that for every person infected [as indicated by a positive Covid-19 test] there are 10 more infected than never were tested. If so, [then] Medellín would already have around 800,000 infected and the Medellin metropolitan area more than 1 million, with most already cured.

“With the [Colombian] National Institute of Health, we will carry out a ‘seroprevalence’ study in Medellín to determine what percentage of the population has already been infected and did not realize it. This will help us refine our ability to manage the infection and the ICU [intensive care unit occupation] curve [see chart, above].

“Regarding the number of cases, we remain in a plateau state without geometric growth and with 96.3% of people who have already overcome the contagion. Self-care has meant that only 10% of cases are among people older than 70 years [the most vulnerable population]. With them we must take the greatest care.

“The ICU occupancy rate has grown driven not by Covid but by delayed surgeries and other diseases. Among Covid cases, we have 249 stable cases, 63 with other respiratory Infections and 358 others in ICU now because of delayed surgeries and other diseases, which is increasing.

The [Antioquia] government has the autonomy to restrict delayed surgeries by raising the hospital [ICU occupancy rate] alert level to ‘red.’ However, this would not require quarantine implications for the city or its metropolitan area due to the reasons that I will explain.

“Medellín has 1,000 ICU beds, not counting the ones we [could] have available from ‘InspiraMed’ [project], which would add more than 300. Of these 1,000, 220 will be activated whenever the Covid [ICU case rate] requires it. To support the current conjuncture of overdue surgeries we will activate 26 this week.

“Many ask, ‘why not activate all of the [spare ICU beds] immediately?’ The first reason is budgetary. Hospitals burdened with debt cannot activate an ICU bed to keep it empty [in stand-by status]. An ICU requires a group of professionals available 24/7.

“Therefore, the activation of the [ICU] beds has been agreed in a phased scheme with the hospital managers and health personnel to take care of the [hospital] finances, avoid the arrival of foreign doctors and guarantee care with the highest standards of quality.

“Medellín has managed to manage the contagion curve thanks to the use of technology, giving us time to manufacture ventilators and comply with the ‘ICU 1,000’ plan.

“The number of ICU patients due to Covid in our health system has remained stable [see chart above, gray line] and below what we expected for this date. This has made it unnecessary to activate new ICU beds that have costs for hospitals.

“However, it is essential to recognize that this is an unprecedented and unpredictable crisis. There are questions still to be resolved: Will new [Covid-19] strains come? Will there be a vaccine? The only way is to keep investigating,” according to the Mayor.


Medellin-based utilities giant EPM announced October 16 that it has now completed all 35 scheduled measures to slash foul odors from its recently inaugurated “Aguas Claras” sewage treatment plant in the northern Medellin suburb of Bello.

The only remaining measure (number 36) is to complete a neighborhood survey asking local people about the effectiveness of the technical measures undertaken to avoid foul odors from the plant, according to EPM.

EPM subsidiary Aguas Nacionales just presented its progress report on "Aguas Claras" to the Antioquia Departmental Environmental Council (CODEAM).

“CODEAM, which has met periodically since February of this year, is made up of representatives of the [neighboring] Bellanita community, councilors and representatives of the Community Action Boards of the [plant’s] area-of-influence, Secretary of the Environment of the Government of Antioquia, Bello’s Secretary of Environment, the Bello Health Secretariat, Medellín and Bello Comptrollers’ Offices, the Health and Social Protection Section of the Antioquia Government, the Metropolitan Area ofValle de Aburrá [AMVA] and EPM,” according to the company.

“According to the measurements of Aguas Nacionales and EPM, which are reported and monitored by AMVA within CODEAM, odors have been considerably reduced, as of the fulfillment of this optimization plan. It has been about eight months of work to overcome the odor conditions that were presented at the beginning of 2020.

“With the San Fernando sewage treatment plant (located in the southern Medellin suburb of Itagüí) and Aguas Claras (in Bello) now operating, EPM treats 84% of the wastewater coming from homes, businesses, industries and companies in the Aburrá Valley,” the company added.


U.S.-based multinational snack-foods giant PepsiCo announced October 14 a US$93 million investment in a production plant in Guarne, Antioquia, just east of Medellin.

Colombia President Ivan Duque hailed the announcement during a nationally televised address October 14, citing this latest example of economic reactivation initiatives here even in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic.

“This investment will strengthen the company’s value chain in four pillars: innovation and infrastructure, agriculture, communities, and sustainability,” according to PepsiCo Colombia.

The Guarne plant project “began in August 2020, with local labor, and is expected to be completed in 2022,” according to the company.

“This will be the largest PepsiCo plant in the country, with different production lines that include brands such as ‘Natuchips,’ ‘DeTodito’ and ‘Doritos,’ and will have around 400 workers,” according to the company.

“The investment, which includes packaging automation technologies, will complement PepsiCo’s manufacturing system in Colombia and will allow it to continue to consolidate itself as one of the most important companies in the country, as it has been since its arrival in 1947.”

On a parallel front, “PepsiCo and its [charitable] Foundation will continue to develop initiatives along priority lines such as water [conservation], recycling, the empowerment of women and sustainable agriculture,” the company added.

“Currently there are 10 programs in 12 municipalities throughout the country, a number that is projected to increase after the investment. In addition, PepsiCo will continue to strengthen associations of small farmers and expand its areas of intervention in the Colombian countryside,” according to the company.

Water conservation, recycling and solar-electric power production are among the technologies to be employed at the new plant in Guarne, Antioquia, the company added.


Page 10 of 70

About Medellin Herald

Medellin Herald is a locally produced, English-language news and advisory service uniquely focused upon a more-mature audience of visitors, investors, conference and trade-show attendees, property buyers, expats, retirees, volunteers and nature lovers.

U.S. native Roberto Peckham, who founded Medellin Herald in 2015, has been residing in metro Medellin since 2005 and has traveled regularly and extensively throughout Colombia since 1981.

Medellin Herald welcomes your editorial contributions, comments and story-idea suggestions. Send us a message using the "contact" section.

Contact US

logo def
Medellin Herald: Find news, information, reviews and opinion on business, events, conferences, congresses, education, real estate, investing, retiring and more.
  • COL (4) 386 06 27
  • USA (1) 305 517 76 35
  •  www.medellinherald.com 
  •  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
  • Medellin, Antioquia, Colombia

Medellín Photo Galery

Medellin, contrasting colors and styles by Gabriel Buitrago

MPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGnav