Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Become part of our community

captcha 

Nutresa 1Q 2020 Profits Rise 9% Year-on-Year

Saturday, 25 April 2020 13:26 Written by

While most Colombia-based companies are getting clobbered by the Coronavirus crisis, companies making and selling groceries and prepared foods through stores to date are doing relatively well.

Example: Medellin-based multinational foods giant Grupo Nutresa on April 24 reported a COP$190 billion (US$47 million) consolidated net profit for first quarter (1Q) 2020, up 9.1% year-on-year.

Consolidated sales rose 18.4%, to COP$2.7 trillion (US$668 million), according to the company.

“Excluding the acquisitions of Atlantic Food Service in Colombia, and of Cameron’s Coffee in the United States, the group’s organic sales growth was 13%,” according to Nutresa.

“In Colombia, sales had a solid performance at COP$1.6 trillion (US$395 million), 61.2% of the group’s total sales, with a growth of 15.5% compared to the same period in 2019.

“Organic growth was equally outstanding, with an increase of 11.6%. About 85% of the growth dynamic in Colombia was driven by higher volumes.”

International sales expressed in Colombian pesos rose 23%, to COP$1 trillion (US$247 million).
“International organic growth, in U.S. dollars, was up 2%, and in COP, up 15.3%,” the company added.

Positive sales growth came from “a portfolio of foods for daily consumption at home, which have had adequate availability in traditional channels such as neighborhood stores, supermarkets, and supermarkets, as well as in alternative channels of the group,” according to Nutresa.

Operating profit rose 11.5%, to COP$256.6 billion (US$63 million), while earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization rose 17.5%, to COP$376 billion (US$93 million). with EBITDA margin at 14.1%.

“This result was the result of a management oriented towards the rationalization of spending, with the aim of having an increasingly efficient and flexible structure,” according to Nutresa.

Financial expense rose 6.1% “derived from the greater indebtedness for the acquisition of Cameron’s Coffee in 2019 and new loans for working capital taken during the period,” according to the company.


The Medellin Chamber of Commerce for Antioquia (CCMA) just revealed a new study indicating that the Coronavirus quarantine costs the local economy here at least COP$170 billion (US$42 million) every day -- and 95% of businesses have seen sales drop anywhere from 80% 100% during the crisis.

As a result, Antioquia regional gross domestic product (“PIB” in Spanish initials) likely will come in at a net-negative 1.5% to 2% this year -- barring some dramatic reversal, according to CCMA.

To get an idea of this impact, Antioquia’s GDP in December 2019 alone was COP$134 trillion (US$33 billion), according to CCMA.

“Of the 3 million employed persons in Antioquia department, close to 1 million work in activities at high risk of Covid-19, and losses of between 112,000 and 131,000 jobs are projected, which implies an increase in the unemployment rate close to 15%,” according to the trade group.

Because of quarantine rules to date, “55% of the companies in Antioquia are not currently operating. These represent 41.2% of formal jobs,” according to CCMA.

The controlled reopening of construction and manufacturing sectors on April 27 will help industry and employment -- but won’t solve all the current problems, the group added.

What’s more, 88% of companies only have enough cash-on-hand to survive a maximum of one to two months, CCMA’s survey found.

Meanwhile, ANDI – Colombia’s biggest national industrial/commercial trade association – on April 23 released findings of its second survey on cash liquidity among 238 member companies.

“Compared to the results of the previous survey, it can be seen that the liquidity situation of companies today with updated information as of April is more critical to the extent that the vast majority of companies have not received income and have had to continue to cover their expenses,” according to ANDI.

“In effect, with updated information, companies only have 11 days to operate if they allocate the entire cash flow of the company to fulfill all their obligations -- that is, the entire payroll including social security, suppliers, financial sector, contracts and Dian [taxes].

“In the case of manufacturing companies, they have 12 days to operate” if cash-on-hand were disbursed to cover all outstanding expenses, ANDI found.

“In the manufacturing industry, there is an average of 42 days in cash to cover the salary of employees, 31 days to meet the full payroll including social security payments, 15 days to pay suppliers, 38 days to cover fixed expenses associated with contracts and loans acquired with the financial sector, 43 days for the payment of withholding tax and 42 days for the payment of VAT [value-added tax] withholding.

“However, the situation is much more complex for a large number of companies: 38.7% of the companies surveyed only have sufficient cash to cover between one and eight days if they meet all their obligations of payroll, suppliers, fixed expenses, financial sector and Dian, while 17.1% only have between nine and 15 days left, while 27. 6% have between 16 and 30 days. Thus, 83.4% have cash to operate for a month or less.”


 

Medellin Mayor Daniel Quintero announced April 24 a novel computerized registration scheme – unique in all Colombia -- for all employers and employees in the construction and manufacturing sectors that are reopening for business on April 27 in the Valle de Aburra metro area.

Employers are now registering their businesses (and their employees) at https://www.medellin.gov.co/irj/portal/medellin/acceso-formulario-permisos-empresas while employees also are registering themselves at https://www.medellin.gov.co/medellinmecuida/.

With this computerized information, enforcement officials will be able to track and control movements to-and-from workplaces as well as limit use of the Metro public transport system only to people authorized to venture out to work -- as well as those authorized for grocery, drugs and banking on “pico y cedula” days.

Companies that lack the new “Medellinmecuida” registrations will be shut down and fined, while individual persons lacking this registration likewise will be fined, he said.

In addition, registered companies that detect two or more cases of workers with Coronavirus will be shut down for at least 14 days, Mayor Quintero explained.

An estimated 800,000 people in the Medellin metro area are likely to make work trips starting April 27 -- thanks to the restart of manufacturing and construction sectors as allowed by new Colombian government regulations, Quintero said.

To aid enforcement and limit potential Coronavirus infections, Medellin police will have a new cell-phone app that can read and determine instantaneously whether any person stopped on the street, on the Metro system or at work is authorized to be circulating. Likewise, the Metro “Civica” card used to access the public transit system can be read by the same cell-phone app, thus helping to limit potential crowding and cross-infections.

Any non-complying person found on these detection sweeps will have their “Civica” card deactivated -- and if there’s Coronavirus symptoms detected on this person, then the employer’s business also can be shuttered.

While telecommuting is mandated by the national government wherever possible during this crisis, relatively Coronavirus-free bicycling options also are expanding with new dedicated bike lanes and every-10-minutes disinfections of the “Encicla” free bicycles tied to Medellin’s “Metro” system, Quintero added.

Simultaneously, “pico y placa” restrictions on vehicles also are being lifted to enable more people to avoid overcrowding on the “Metro” system, Quintero added.

Meanwhile, according to Colombia’s Minister of Commerce, Industry and Tourism (MinCIT), seven more sub-sectors of manufacturing are returning to work on April 27, including textiles and clothing; leather and shoe-making; woodworking; paper and cardboard manufacture; chemicals manufacture; metalworking; and manufacture of electrical equipment.

These businesses can stay open only if they meet strict, new Ministry of Health biosafety protocols including mandatory use of facemasks, workplace disinfection, worker health detection, removal of workers with symptoms, distancing rules and adherence to the 35% limit on mass transport capacity.

It’s up to local mayors and departmental governors to enforce these new biosafety protocols in coordination with Health Ministry officials and local and departmental health authorities, MinCIT Minister Jose Manuel Restrepo added.

These mayors and governors can shut-down any company or any industry that isn’t complying with these biosafety measures, he said.

On the other hand, companies that voluntarily decide not to reopen would forfeit access to multiple credit and financing programs created by the national government in response to the Coronavirus crisis, he added.

These industry/company shut-down rule provisions in the new MinCIT rules could for example help mayors to address fears about the health impacts of the partial economic reopening of construction and manufacturing sectors on April 27.

For example, Bogota Mayor Claudia Lopez -- who is publicly fighting with President Ivan Duque over the partial reopening --  presumably could shutter manufacturing by citing her claims that the manufacturing industry in Bogota isn’t nearly ready to comply with biosafety rules on April 27. Nor is Bogota’s public transit system ready to accept a big surge of passengers, according to Mayor Lopez.


The Area Metropolitana de Valle de Aburra (AMVA) announced April 23 that Medellin and all its neighbors in Valle de Aburra will switch to a unified “pico y cedula” system restricting grocery, medicine and banking trips to certain days of the week during the Coronavirus quarantine.

The new order covers Medellin, Barbosa, Itagüí, Caldas, Sabaneta, La Estrella, Envigado, Bello, Copacabana and Girardota, according to AMVA.

So, starting next Monday (April 27), people with Colombia cedula numbers ending in 7 or 8 can venture out for groceries, drugs and banking, while people with cedulas ending in 9 or 0 can venture out the following day (Tuesday, April 28) -- with further successive number rotations on following days (see chart, above).

Then, on Monday, May 4, a new rotation starts, so people with cedulas ending in 2 or 3 can venture out, while those with cedulas ending in 4 or 5 can venture out on Tuesday, May 5, with further successive number rotations on following days.

Colombia's national quarantine is presumptively set to expire May 11.  But depending upon the evolution of the Coronavirus infection curve, it's possible that another 14-day extension could be announced. So, revised "pico y cedula" rules might be extended yet again starting May 11.

Most people 70 years and older, and all school-age students, will remain in mandatory quarantine until May 30 -- but have the same cedula/day excursion allowances.  

Meanwhile, the government potentially might announce further easings of quarantine restrictions on certain industries in coming days or weeks -- but coupled with strict health protocols that already apply to construction, manufacturing, mining, agriculture, food retailing, pharmacies and public services. 

 


AngloGold Ashanti Colombia announced April 23 that its proposed “Quebradona” copper-gold mine project near Jerico, Antioquia soon will get a second information-gathering visit from Colombia’s Agencia Nacional de Licencias Ambientales (ANLA, the environmental permitting agency).

Commenting on the news, company president Felipe Marquez added that the upcoming site visit “is very positive because it will enable [ANLA] to get more information for a licensing decision that will enjoy absolute transparency, technical rigor and opportune citizen participation.”

“The second visit will be made once the national government lifts the restrictions that were established before the health emergency that the country is experiencing due to the spread of Covid-19,” according to AngloGold Ashanti.

On a parallel front, AngloGold announced that as of April 21, the company restarted some preliminary works at the site – following new Colombia Health Ministry biosafety protocols to protect workers and people near the site from contracting Coronavirus.

“Quebradona resumes some of its activities in the field with the purpose of reactivating the work and advancing the activities that are essential for the continuity of the project,” according to AngloGold.

“The restart of priority activities is carried out within the framework of a strict biosecurity protocol that seeks to protect the health and life of its collaborators, contractors, suppliers and inhabitants of its area of influence.

“There are some tasks and activities that, by their nature, require to be carried out on site and which are not a source of risk for community contagion, since they do not crowd large numbers of people around one site, they do not take place in closed spaces and they do not imply interaction with people who come from the outside.

“In line with the regulations of the Ministries of Health and Social Protection, Labor and Mines and Energy, which established the conditions under which the mining sector can operate and complying with the recommendations of the Jericho Ministry of Health, AngloGold Ashanti designed complete and detailed operating protocols aimed at minimizing the risk of spreading the Covid-19.

“The protocols include provisions related to the control and rapid detection of possible cases, mandatory hygiene measures for people, sanitation processes for facilities, measures for the transport of personnel, recommendations for extra-occupational care, guidelines for health personnel, among others.”


Colombia’s main trade associations for departmental governors and mayorships just endorsed what most Colombians view as President Ivan Duque’s rational, science-driven and politically reasonable handling of the Coronavirus crisis.

The National Federation of Departments (FND) and the Colombian Federation of Municipalities (FCM) on April 22 publicly endorsed President Duque’s mandatory quarantine extension through May 11 – along with a gradual, controlled restart of construction and manufacturing industries under strict health protocols.

In a joint letter, the groups praised what they termed as “successful handling that the President has given to the crisis generated by the Covid-19, protecting life and health, and preventing a pandemic of unemployment, hunger, poverty and recession from being generated,” according to FND and FCM.

Even more telling: the just-released EcoAnalytic/Guarumo poll of eligible Colombian voters (see Medellin Herald, 21 April 2020) found that 74.5% of voters endorse Duque’s handling of the Coronavirus crisis and 81.5% endorsed his mandatory quarantine policy -- while 63% of voters reject the continuing anti-Duque demagoguery of Senator Gustavo Petro, who lost to Duque in a landslide in the 2018 presidential election.

However: This EcoAnalytic/Guarumo poll also revealed that only 33.5% favor continuation of the Coronavirus quarantine beyond April 27, while 45.8% favor terminating the quarantine.

Reason: Employment is now the number-one worry, at 32.4% of Colombians polled, with the possibility of Coronavirus infection only the second-greatest worry, at 23.4%, the poll shows.

Despite growing panic over jobs and the economy, Bogota Mayor Claudia López -- who campaigned for demagogue Petro in the 2018 election -- is launching Quixotic attacks on Duque, signaling the start of her expected 2022 campaign for the Colombian presidency.

President Duque by contrast isn’t running for anything, as Colombia’s constitution only allows a single term.

The first López attack – likely aiming to shift blame for any personal responsibility for Bogota having by far the worst Coronavirus prevalence in all Colombia – came in a theatrical bloviation, blaming the Bogota airport as the principal culprit.

“Over my dead body,” López yelled to reporters over the non-existent, Quixotic idea of reopening Bogota’s airport.

Ironically, President Duque has blocked all passenger air traffic at all Colombian airports and has publicly stated he has no intention of restarting international flights.

Beyond tilting at windmills over the airport non-issue, now Mayor López is criticizing President Duque’s decision to allow strictly controlled reopenings of construction and manufacturing sectors – combined with strict limits on public passenger transport (maximum 35% of capacity, mandatory masks, mandatory distancing) along with Duque’s initiatives and mandates to expand relatively safe, Coronavirus-free bicycle transport and telecommuting alternatives.

However, even a well-controlled reopening of public transport means more passengers on Bogota’s public transport system. Hence, according to López, this inevitably means more Coronavirus cross-infections.

However, all recent economic-expert reports agree that Colombia must gradually restart its economy – under strict health controls -- or else watch its entire economy collapse, hurtling millions more into poverty, accompanied by inevitable food riots, massive street violence and a likely surge in deaths from other poverty-linked diseases.

Which begs the question: Is demanding a total shutdown of the Colombian economy -- while waiting another 12 to 18 months for a Coronavirus vaccine -- the smart way for López to start a 2022 presidential campaign?


The Medellin-based “Covipacifico” consortium building the “Pacifico 1” highway between Medellin’s southern suburbs (Ancon Sur) and the Cauca River town of Bolombolo on April 20 unveiled details on construction relaunch -- tied to strict Coronavirus-avoidance protocols.

According to the consortium, “some of the measures endorsed by the ANI [Colombia’s infrastructure agency] and the [Health Ministry Coronavirus prevention] audit are disinfection of personnel, [safe separation distances] on buses, modification of schedules for the use of common areas, cleaning of vehicles and spaces.

“Taking into account that the national government ordered the reactivation of transportation and public works (Decree 531 of April 8, 2020), the Pacific Highway Concessionaire (Covipacífico), presented to the ANI and the other authorities the biosafety protocol to protect the health of workers, road users and the community in general.

“Said plan has been socialized by the national government and the Antioquia government with the mayors of the southwest,” according to the consortium.

Among the new biosecurity measures adopted for construction restart:

1. Manual and frequent fumigation of tools and equipment used in construction, maintenance and operation activities.
2. Installation of 12 points for disinfecting personnel, four times a day.
3. Realignment of 10-hour worker shifts mainly to ensure compliance with distancing measures.
4. Checking of body temperatures and vital signs of workers before they enter vehicles.
5. Mandatory completion of a symptomatology questionnaire before boarding buses.
6. Any sign of symptoms means mandatory exclusion from transport and work sites.
6. Disinfection of buses. 
7. Mandatory minimum distance between workers at work sites.
8. Mandatory use of masks, disposable gloves and glasses.


Colombia’s national infrastructure agency (Agencia Nacional de Infraestructura, ANI) announced April 21 the restart of 12 crucial highway construction projects in Antioquia -- thanks to new biosafety protocols to avoid Coronavirus infections.

“Among the 12 infrastructure projects that will restart works are ‘Autopista al Mar 1,’ which seeks to bring Medellín closer to the main centers of commercial exchange such as the Caribbean Coast, the Pacific Coast and the Magdalena River,” according to ANI.

“Large-scale works stand out, such as the construction of the second tube of the western tunnel [connecting Medellin with the Mar 1 highway to Santa Fe de Antioquia], which is 4.6-kilometers-long and has registered progress of 75% to date.

“Meanwhile, in the Pacifico 1, 2 and 3 projects, which will connect the capital of Antioquia with the Valle del Cauca, the coffee region and the southwest of the country, works such as the Sinifaná tunnel [part of Pacifico 1] are already in waterproofing stage.

“The Mulatos tunnel -- which belongs to Pacífico 2 -- and the Pacifico 3 highway project both have restarted construction works, while the Thessalia tunnel --the largest and most important in the coffee region -- has successfully completed [end-to-end excavation] last March, totaling 3.5-kilometers in length,” ANI added.

Other crucial restarts include the “Vías del Nus” project (already 61% complete) connecting Medellin and northern Antioquia to the northern Atlantic coast; the “Conexión Norte” project ( 55% complete) connecting the municipality of Remedios to Zaragosa, Antioquia; and the just-restarted “Magdalena 2” project, which includes a nearly complete bridge over Rio Magdalena at Puerto Berrio, Antioquia.

In addition, more restarts include the Antioquia-Bolívar highway; the “Transversal de las Américas” highway; the “Devimed” project between Medellin, Marinilla and Santuario [Medellin-Bogota highway], and the Girardot-Honda–Puerto Salgar “Tramo La Dorada” projects in Antioquia, according to ANI.


Colombia President Ivan Duque announced last night (April 20) in a nationwide televised address that the current Coronavirus quarantine that had been set to expire April 27 instead will be extended another two weeks—to May 11.

Broader quarantines on vulnerable populations including school-age students and those over 70 will continue through May 30.

Aside from occasional emergency humanitarian flights, all international passenger flights will be banned through May 30. Even domestic passenger flights are doubtful aside from a few, potential exemptions, he added.

However, Colombia’s construction and manufacturing industries will be allowed to return to work – but only if following strict protocols to reduce the spread of Coronavirus infections.

Similarly, mass-transit systems in Colombia’s major cities (including metro Medellin) will begin a gradual return to normality -- but initially will run at maximum 35% capacity to provide more space between possibly infected passengers, he said.

In addition, all mass-transit passengers must wear protective masks and maintain at least one-meter distance from one-another, he said.
What’s more, “we are not going to have inter-municipal transport except for the exceptions that were already defined by the Ministry of Transport,” which can allow mixed freight/passenger transport -- but with reduced-capacity ceilings.

“Our first responsibility is the protection of life, health, but doing it hand-in-hand so that the Coronavirus does not end up generating an unemployment pandemic of poverty or recession,” President Duque said.

While construction and factory workers can return to work, office workers in construction and manufacturing will be required to telecommute via internet connections from home.

“Anyone who can continue to telework must do so to protect life and protect health,” he said.

Meanwhile, no mass-attendance events will be allowed. Bars, clubs, schools and universities will remain closed, but home-deliveries will be allowed from restaurants.

Vice-President, Ministers Explain Health Protocols

During the same televised address last night, Colombia Vice-President Marta Lucía Ramírez, Housing Minister Jonathan Malagón, and Transport Minister Ángela María Orozco provided more details on new biosecurity protocols for productive sectors and mass transport.

In many cases, workers will be required to wear protective clothing, masks and gloves, while disinfection campaigns typically will be mandatory at work spaces.

What’s more, manufacturers will require back-office workers to telecommute, Ramirez said.

As for the construction sector, Housing Minister Malagón added that a huge portion of this activity is in housing. “In the case of Colombia, there are more than 200,000 homes being built per year, the vast majority of which are already sold [to waiting buyers],” he said.

“There are 980,000 vulnerable workers that we have in the building sector, and if, eventually, the viability of their jobs is compromised, it would not only be from a macroeconomic point of view close to several percentage points of the unemployment rate, but we would start a tragic pilgrimage from formal employment to poverty, and that is what we are trying to prevent,” he added.

Regarding transportation, Minister Angela María Orozco pointed out that safe access to boarding/unboarding stations and terminals must be guaranteed, always respecting the minimum distance of one-to-two meters.

“Inside each [mass-transport] vehicle, there is a minimum distance of one meter between passengers. That’s what has led us to calculate that obviously the buses that are part of the mass transportation systems will not be able to carry more than 35% of their usual transportation capacity,” she said.

“It is also essential that each passenger wear a mask, and that is precisely why we are designing and, with the Ministry of Health, teaching citizens to make masks, as these are conventional masks, not the special masks for people who are in the health sector,” she added.

Health Ministry Sees Flattening Infection Curve

On a related front, Colombia’s National Institute of Health (“INS” in Spanish initials) announced April 20 that the national quarantine is indeed helping to flatten the growth curve of Coronavirus infections.

INS director Martha Lucía Ospina Martínez explained that a mathematical prediction model adopted by Colombia for the Covid-19 “has allowed us to understand what the cases or the maximum numbers that Colombia could have, what the dates would be and what would also be the critical moments” that could overwhelm the health-care sector.

Health Minister Fernando Ruiz added that person-to-person transmission of Coronavirus had started-out at a rate of 2.5 -- that is, one person could transmit it to 2.5 more persons.

But thanks to the quarantine measures and other restrictions, the rate fell to 1.5 “and at this moment, as we are evaluating the quarantine, we are approaching 1. I hope we get below that number, but it is evident that we are getting closer,” Ruiz said.

As of April 20, the Health Ministry confirmed 3,977 confirmed cases of Coronavirus nationally , with 189 deaths and 804 recoveries.

Bogota has the most cases ((1,682), followed by Cali/Valle del Cauca (683) and then Medellin/Antioquia (363), according to the Ministry.

 


Until the Coronavirus crisis appeared, Colombia President Ivan Duque generally had difficulty connecting with voters and had slipped in popularity polls -- initially because of a prior failure to build a broader, effective coalition in the multi-party Colombian Congress.

But that’s all changed since Duque successfully broadened his Congress base late last year – and even more so now, because of what most people view as a timely, balanced, responsible and respectful response to the Coronavirus crisis.

According to the just-issued EcoAnalytica/Guarumo poll of eligible voters in Colombia (see: https://s3.amazonaws.com/Guarumo/ecoanalitica/2020_04_Percepcion_Pais.pdf), Duque’s favorability ranking hit 63.2% this month, while Medellin Mayor Daniel Quintero also now enjoys a similarly favorable 65.3% ranking.

Former M-19 guerilla, now-Senator Gustavo Petro – who lost in a landslide to President Duque in the 2018 presidential election – now has the worst ranking among all national politicians at 63.3% unfavorability. Only 27.8% now give the bombastic, incendiary Petro a “favorable” ranking -- worse than his nemesis, former President, now-Senator Alvaro Uribe (40% favorable, 52% unfavorable).

While Duque has won overwhelming praise from the voting population over his handling of the Coranavirus crisis, the poll shows that Colombian voters are nevertheless increasingly worried about what’s going to happen to their jobs.

In total, 74.5% have endorsed Duque’s handling of the Coronavirus crisis -- and 81.5% endorsed the mandatory quarantine.

However: Only 33.5% of those polled now favor continuation of the Coronavirus quarantine beyond April 27, with 45.8% favoring termination of the quarantine after April 27.

Rationale: employment is now the number-one worry, at 32.4% of those polled, with the possibility of Coronavirus infection only the second-greatest worry, at 23.4%, the poll shows.

“Health” concerns were cited by another 10.7%, followed by “the economy” at 6.2%” and “corruption,” also at 6.2% in the descending list of worries.

“Education” was the sixth-most worry, at 4.5%, followed by “security” at 3.4%. “Peace” was next at 2.3%, followed by “the environment,” in eighth-place (1.6%), while “justice” came-in ninth place (1.4%), the polling shows.


Page 11 of 61

About Medellin Herald

Medellin Herald is a locally produced, English-language news and advisory service uniquely focused upon a more-mature audience of visitors, investors, conference and trade-show attendees, property buyers, expats, retirees, volunteers and nature lovers.

U.S. native Roberto Peckham, who founded Medellin Herald in 2015, has been residing in metro Medellin since 2005 and has traveled regularly and extensively throughout Colombia since 1981.

Medellin Herald welcomes your editorial contributions, comments and story-idea suggestions. Send us a message using the "contact" section.

Contact US

logo def
Medellin Herald: Find news, information, reviews and opinion on business, events, conferences, congresses, education, real estate, investing, retiring and more.
  • COL (4) 386 06 27
  • USA (1) 305 517 76 35
  •  www.medellinherald.com 
  •  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
  • Medellin, Antioquia, Colombia

Medellín Photo Galery

Medellin, contrasting colors and styles by Gabriel Buitrago

MPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGnav