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The Medellin Mayor’s office announced last night (April 12) that the “pico y cedula” alternating-days individual permissions for grocery, medicines and banking trips are rotating today (April 13) through April 19, and then a new rotation starts again on April 20.

As a result, people with cedula numbers ending in 7, 8 or 9 can venture out today (April 13), while those with cedulas ending in 0 or 1 can venture out tomorrow (see chart, above), followed by successive rotations continuing through April 19.

As of Monday, April 20, people with cedulas ending in 2 or 3 can venture out, while cedulas ending in 4 or 5 can venture out on April 21 (see chart), then successive rotations continue through April 26.

The national quarantine is presumptively set to expire on April 27 (but might be extended).  As a result, it’s conceivable that “pico y cedula” restrictions in major metro areas in Colombia (including metro Medellin) might continue beyond April 27.

Bello, Sabaneta and Itagui also announced "pico y cedula" rotation changes last night, matching the new Medellin numerical rotations.

Meanwhile, other municipalities around Medellin also have had "pico y cedula" restrictions, but hadn't announced any changes as of April 12.


Utilities giant EPM and the Mayor of Medellin on April 12 generated more than COP$13 billion (US$3.4 million) worth of private donations – both in cash and also in food -- through a televised “Donaton por Medellin” campaign, aiming to help Coronavirus victims and especially poor families.

Among the first announcing support for the “Donaton” were Bancolombia (COP$400 million/US$104,000). Bancolombia also separately donated another COP$200 million (US$52,000) for a Coronavirus respirator-consortium research project here organized by Medellin-based tech incubator Ruta N and Colombia’s industrial-commercial trade association ANDI.

Medellin-based cement/power/highways concessionaire Grupo Argos pitched-in another COP$400 million (US$104,000) for the “Donaton,” while Medellin-based insurance giant Grupo Sura likewise donated COP$300 million (US$78,000).

Also during the "Donaton," Medellin-based supermarket giant Grupo Exito announced the donation of 20,000 bags of food containing 12 vital, basic items -- all for poor families affected by the crisis. Grupo Exito and its customers have been massively subsidizing basic food packages for poor families, pregnant women and young children for years, on top of the latest "Donaton" donations.

According to the Mayor's office, the biggest single donor late last night was Medellin-based electric power transmission giant ISA (COP$4 billion/ US$1.03 million), followed by Barranquilla-based national charity Fundacion Santo Domingo (COP$500 million/ US$129,000).

 Antioquia-based dairy cooperative Colanta pitched-in another COP$300 million (US$78,000) while banana-producer cooperative Uniban chipped-in COP$100 million (US$26,000).

The Medellin-based Une-EPM "Tigo" national telecom/internet company put in another COP$400 million (US$104,000) and Tigo employees added another COP$220 million (US$57,000) worth of food-bank donations for the poor.

Freight logistics specialist Distrimarcas contributed COP$100 million (US$26,000) while agricultural supplies giant Grupo Bios added another COP$260 million (US$67,000), according to the Mayor. 

Medellin-based international rock-star musicians Maluma (COP$200 million/US$52,000), J Balvin (20,000 food baskets) and Juanes (780 food baskets) also announced donations to the "Donaton," while Argos, Sura, Bancolombia and Medellin-based multinational foods giant Nutresa separately announced joint collaborations on more, massive food donations for poor families affected by Coronavirus crisis.

In total, more than 100,000 bags of basic food packages for the poor had been pledged or gathered during the “Donaton.”

President Duque Abolishes Home-Delivery Restrictions

Meanwhile, Colombia President Ivan Duque announced April 12 that as of the first minute of Monday, April 13, prior hours-of-operations restrictions on home deliveries of foods and groceries to quarantined people will be eliminated during the Coronavirus crisis.

Under “Decree 536,” the former 6:00 am to 8:00 pm restriction for home deliveries is eliminated as of April 13, according to the President.

On a related front, President Duque separately announced that “more than 100 medical products to attend the [Coronavirus crisis] situation will not have VAT [value-added tax].”

“Today we need to be more united than ever to overcome this pandemic, but also beyond today we have to be more united than ever to get our country moving ahead, our economy ahead, our jobs ahead, our opportunities ahead,” he added.

Deaths Soon Topping 100 Nationally

Meanwhile, Colombia’s Health Ministry reported that as of April 11, Colombia had a total of 2,709 cases of Coronavirus, led by Bogota (1,164); Cali/Valle del Cauca (479) and Medellin/Antioquia (253).

So far, 100 persons have died from Coronavirus complications (including one 90-year-old woman in Antioquia) while 214 persons have recovered fully, according to the Ministry.


Three prototypes of mechanical ventilators being developed for Coronavirus victims by metro-Medellin-based Sampedro Medical Industries, the University of Antioquia and the EIA University are now set to move to human trials following successful tests at CES University School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Husbandry here.

The development teams are now preparing for tests on human beings and, subsequently, the start of production at two Medellin-metro manufacturing giants: multinational home-appliance manufacturing giant Haceb and motorcycle assembling giant Auteco.

“Advances like the one taking place today are possible thanks to [Medellin-born multinational bottled drinks maker] Postobón’s donation in the project,” according to an April 10 announcement from Medellin-based tech incubator Ruta N, organizer of the “#InnspiraMED” ventilator consortium.

“The three mechanical ventilators for intensive care units (ICUs) [for #InnspiraMED] successfully carried out preclinical tests in the operating rooms of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Zootechnics of CES University,” according to Ruta N.

“The three devices, which are a success thanks to the donation of Postobón and hundreds of people who have joined this initiative through the #InnovaPorLaVida and # UnidosSomosPaís platforms, have been developed in compliance with Invima [Colombia’s national medical-standards regulator] quality and safety standards. The articulation work between all the actors has been led by Ruta N and ANDI [Colombia’s national industrial-commercial trade association].

“One of the prerequisites for achieving success in preclinical trials was the development of in-vitro [laboratory-scale] tests by the group of anesthesia and critical care specialists at the San Vicente Fundación University Hospital, the Las Américas Clinic and the Pablo Tobón Uribe Hospital. These tests consisted of subjecting the ventilators to different clinical conditions with highly specialized simulators that evaluate their operation and, thus, be able to determine how safe they are for patients.

“With the results of the preclinical tests, preparations will be made to proceed with tests on humans, which will allow the devices to be definitively validated and go to the production phase that will be headed by Haceb and Auteco,” Ruta N added.

The three prototypes were designed for rapid scale-up for production, according to the consortium.

FLA Delivering Antiseptic Alcohol to Stores

Meanwhile, the Antioquia departmental government announced April 8 that starting today (April 11) its government-owned Fabrica de Licores de Antioquia (FLA) will start delivering bottles of antiseptic alcohol (70% pure alcohol) to local supermarkets.

“The product’s profit margins will be minimal for each of the actors in the distribution chain,” according to the FLA.

The FLA earlier produced 250,000 bottles of the alcohol to disaster-response agency DAPARD and subsequently to hospitals, clinics and public-safety agencies, according to the company.

“The main objective is to ensure that the greatest number of people access a product that becomes vital when taking aseptic measures and that contributes, to a large extent, to [Coronavirus] contingency control,” according to the FLA.


Medellin-based multinational utilities giant EPM announced April 8 that it continues work on its US$5 billion, 2.4-gigawatt “Hidroituango” hydroelectric dam in Antioquia despite the Cornavirus crisis that forced quarantines on most commercial and industrial operations.

“The works currently being carried out in the [Hidroituango] project are among the 34 exceptions established by the national government in [Coronavirus quarantine] Decree 457,” EPM noted.

“During this global emergency, the project must continue on several fronts, to mitigate risks and protect the lives of the people who live downstream from the dam works.

“The Hidroituango hydroelectric project has been duly preparing for the timely attention of any case [given the possibility that] Covid-19 may appear among its workers who today work in the Tacuí-Cuní camps of EPM and Villa Luz of the CCCI construction consortium.

“During the [quarantine] containment phase, the project concentrated its efforts on preventing the entry of the virus into the camps, and although the containment tasks continue, they are articulated with the implementation of a timely care plan for all those who might become infected within of the project facilities or its camps.

“Through an agreement with the National School of Public Health of the University of Antioquia, an epidemiological surveillance system has been strengthened for the timely detection of any suspected case of Covid-19, the provision of training services and strengthening the municipal health teams for a timely and efficient response to epidemiological alert situations.”

In addition, “personnel with vulnerable conditions -- hypertension, diabetes, cardiac or pulmonary alteration, cancer, immunodeficiencies, those over 60 years of age and women in pregnancy and lactation -- are identified. These staff remain in their homes, under quarantine,” according to EPM.

Further prevention measures include “vehicle disinfection and registration, permanent hand washing, taking of body temperature, disinfection processes for workers, prevention training processes for restaurant personnel, drivers, contractors, and management personnel” as well as “preventive measures in camp restaurants [by] enforcing distance between [serving] lines to avoid closeness and crowding of people.”

Public Utilities Work Continues Normally

Meanwhile, EPM’s electric power, water, sewerage treatment and natural gas utility services continue normally, as the Coronavirus quarantine order specifically exempts public utility workers.

In water and sewer services alone, EPM has 1.29 million customer hookups in Antioquia, serving more than 5 million users in the municipalities of Barbosa, Girardota, Copacabana, Bello, Medellín, Envigado, Itagüí, Sabaneta, La Estrella and Caldas (Valle de Aburrá) and Rionegro (eastern Antioquia).

EPM’s drinking-water transport lines in Antioquia alone total more than 4,195 kilometers. The utility also owns and operates 4,836 kilometers of sewage collection and transport networks here; two huge wastewater treatment plants (in Medellin and Bello); 42 pumps, 125 potable water storage tanks, 100 aqueduct circuits, 73 water-collection basins, 10 purification plants and big water-storage dams including Riogrande II, La Fe and Piedras Blancas.

“For this gigantic infrastructure to operate, we have 1,086 people working -- 613 of them in the field who oversee, repair and maintain networks and equipment to guarantee the safety of the operation,” according to EPM.

“Additionally, these personnel have worked with dedication to reconnect public services to households that due to late payment had been disconnected” prior to the Coronavirus crisis -- following which national and local governments required all Colombian utilities to reconnect delinquent payers at least for the duration of the crisis.


The International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced April 9 that its executive board will recommend approval of a US$10.8 billion line-of-credit request to help Colombian businesses and workers weather the economic downturn caused by the Coronavirus crisis.

“This renewable credit line helps safeguard against external shocks by providing countries who have very strong policy frameworks and track records of economic performance with large, upfront access to IMF resources -- with no ongoing conditions,” according to IMF.

“Given Colombia’s very strong policy frameworks and track record, IMF managing director Kristalina Georgieva intends to recommend approval of the 2020 flexible credit line [FCL] arrangement for Colombia when the IMF executive board meets again to take a decision in the following weeks,” according to the organization.

In addition to the Colombian Treasury Ministry’s new expansion of finance totaling COP$12 trillion (US$3.3 billion) to micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises through the “Fondo Nacional de Garantias” (FNG, National Guarantee Fund), Colombia President Ivan Duque announced April 9 further aid to help small/medium businesses meet payroll.

Government loan guarantees for MSMEs will increase to 80%, up from a prior range of 60% to 70%, Duque announced.

In addition, under the new aid program, the Colombian government will “finance for three months those payrolls of micro-, small and medium enterprises [MSMEs], especially covering people earning up to five monthly [minimum] salaries [COP$4.9 million/US$1,260],” according to President Duque.

Vice Minister of Finance Juan Alberto Londoño added that the payroll-finance scheme will enable MSMEs to issue bonds to be acquired by the financial system.

The government also will waive mandatory pension contributions for the next three months, aiming to help both workers and employers to reduce expenses. However, those already retired will continue to receive their normal pensions, he added.


Medellin-based Grupo Exito announced April 7 that it’s accelerating mass production of special masks to protect against Coronavirus infections – and plans to sell the masks at its Exito, Carulla, Surtimax, SuperInter and Surtimayorista stores throughout Colombia.

“Today more than 3,000 people are dedicated to making face masks in the workshops where the clothes of Grupo Éxito's own brands are usually made,” according to the company.

“Around 50 manufacturing workshops of Grupo Éxito's own brands, located in Antioquia, Valle del Cauca, Caldas and Tolima, are now spaces dedicated to the manufacture of fabric face masks, commonly known as face masks.”

The urgent need for mass production is not only to protect supermarket and pharmacy workers, public utility workers and many others exempt from the current quarantine, but also to protect the general public, the company noted.

“The national government has established the mandatory use of face masks in public transport systems, areas of massive influx of people, people with respiratory symptoms and high-risk groups,” according to Exito.

“Likewise, the making of these cloth masks represents an important boost in a [textile-clothing] sector hit by the effects of Covid-19, to preserve the employment of more than 3,000 collaborators linked to the project."

So far, 20 million face masks have been progressively manufactured since March 18.

“Weekly more than 2 million units are produced by 3,000 people in Cali, Manizales, Ibagué, Medellín, Sabaneta, Envigado, Itagüí, Bello, Santa Rosa de Osos and Don Matías, who as a result of this activity keep their jobs,” according to the company.

“With actions like this we promote work in about 50 textile companies, which brings relief in the face of the economic challenges that the sector and its workers are going through,” added Exito president Carlos Mario Giraldo.

Meanwhile, in an April 6 filing with Colombia’s corporate oversight agency Superfinanciera, Medellin-based textile giant Coltejer revealed that it has just restarted a production line -- dedicated to production of protective clothing and cleaning supplies for confronting the Coronavirus crisis.

Among other local companies already involved in mass production of special textiles to protect people against Coronavirus is clothing giant Everfit, as noted in a report in daily newspaper El Colombiano.


Colombia President Ivan Duque announced last night (April 6) that the current Coronavirus general quarantine – initially due to expire April 13 – instead will continue for another two weeks, until April 27.

What’s more, persons 70 years and older will continue to remain in quarantine until May 30, while school-age pupils of all levels (primary through university) will continue studying at home until May 31, Duque added.

Exceptions to the quarantine include limited trips for groceries, drugs, banking and health care. Healthy workers at supermarkets, pharmacies, banks, hospitals, freight transport, rural transport, farming, food production, public safety, critical construction projects, city public transport, public agencies, social services and certain specially permitted others are exempt from quarantine.

“This decision is made based on recommendations and analysis by a team of scientists and experts with the accompaniment of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO),” according to Duque.

“We had initially thought that children -- young people, university students -- would be out of school until April 20. But given the effort we must make [to stem the threat of Coronavirus infections], we are going to extend those measures until May 31,” he said.

The quarantine not only restricts travel just for basic necessities-- food, medicine, health care, banking -- but also includes border closings, air travel bans, closure of most commercial operations, restrictions on public events, closure of restaurants, bars and nightclubs, and -- in a growing number of municipalities -- “pico y cedula” rules that limit all grocery, pharmacy and banking trips to one or two days per week.

Masks, Medical Equipment Production Incentives

On a related front, Colombia’s Minister of Commerce, Industry and Tourism (MinCIT) José Manuel Restrepo simultaneously announced that starting April 13, a new government program will accelerate the conversion of more factories and workshops to produce more medical supplies and devices.

This “entrepreneurs for employment” program initially aims to accelerate production of more than 20 million protective masks for the general population as well as more than 2 million surgical masks, Restrepo said.

The scheme will enable “a properly endowed health system that has access to medical supplies and devices, disinfection and hygiene products, [general-population] face masks, antibacterial gels, gloves, protective glasses, and specialized masks and protective clothing needed in the health sector,” Restrepo said.

“The government seeks to find potential suppliers and know their production capacities, then connect them with clinics, hospitals and other institutions involved in the care of patients affected by Covid-19.

“Likewise, we seek to identify barriers and needs that entrepreneurs require in order to advance in the production or marketing of such products, in relation to the procedures that apply to them, such as health records, access to raw materials or machinery and technology, among others.”

Entrepreneurs interested in participating in this rapid-development scheme can find more information here: http://www.mincit.gov.co/prensa/medidas-para-mitigar-impacto-del-covid-19/convocatoria-empresarios-por-el-empleo-2020 .

Mask Mandate Goes National

The mask-production acceleration scheme from MinCIT comes on top of an earlier, April 4 order by the Health Ministry that all people moving in and around congested areas in Colombia (including metro Medellin) must start wearing protective masks. According to the Health Ministry, examples include:

1. “Public transport systems (buses, Transmilenio, taxis);
2. “Areas where there is a massive influx of people (market squares, supermarkets, banks, pharmacies, among others) where it is not possible to maintain a minimum distance of one meter.
3. “People with respiratory symptoms: Risk groups (adults over 70 years, people with cardiovascular diseases, diseases that compromise their immune system, cancer, HIV, pregnant women and chronic respiratory diseases).”

In addition, “people with confirmed diagnosis for Covid-19 and their close contacts should not leave the place where they are carrying out their mandatory preventive isolation (14 days without exception),” according to the Ministry.

These Ministry of Health mask-mandates are in addition to a related order from the Mayor of Medellin requiring all passengers on the “Metro” rail, bus, aerial tram and streetcar system to wear protective masks as of April 7.

Treasury Ministry Expands Finance

On a related front, Colombia’s Treasury Ministry announced April 6 that it’s expanding finance totaling COP$12 trillion (US$3 billion) to micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises through the “Fondo Nacional de Garantias” (FNG, National Guarantee Fund) to help them survive during the current crisis.

“In this scheme, the employer may request loans from the financial sector with the guarantee from the FNG for up to $3.316 billion [US$842,000],” according to the Treasury Ministry.

“These credits will have a grace period of four months and a [repayment] term of between 12 and 36 months.

“In this way, the credits required by small and medium-sized enterprises to meet liquidity needs and to assume personnel costs, fixed costs such as rent, public services, among others and other obligations that must be met to maintain their continuity [will be] sustainable,” the Ministry added.

The program will provide government guarantees on 60% on the value of the loan. Companies -- individuals or legal entities -- with sales of up to COP$51.95 billion (US$13.2 million) can access this scheme, according to the Ministry.

The FNG scheme also enables companies to restructure their guaranteed obligations “without having to pay commission for the guarantee for the first year of the restructuring and will only return to pay [commission] from the second year.”

In addition, “employers may defer up to four months the commission payment they must make for renewals or annuity of guaranteed credits,” according to the Ministry.

“Likewise, if the loan guarantees are reaching their final maturity during the next four months and the entrepreneur does not have the liquidity to pay the last installment, then the employer can request a loan extension -- and in this case the FNG will not charge commission until six months later.”

Transport Ministry Clarifies Inter-City Transport Rules

On yet another front, the Transport Ministry on April 5 announced that public inter-municipal transport services will continue to operate -- but with certain restrictions.

“Companies that provide mixed passenger transport service [that is, both passengers and freight] and transport terminals must take into account exceptional operating conditions,” according to the Ministry.

“Inter-municipal road passenger service is allowed for the purpose of access or provision of health services and to facilitate the mobilization of [certain] people . . .

“Routes that operate in nearby municipalities or with economic or social interrelationships with major cities must continue to operate in the same authorized origin and destination sites, according to demand conditions.

“Services other than those provided in dormitory or suburban cities will be understood as those road passenger transport services which usually have coverage for a distance greater than 40 kilometers between origin and destination.

“Due to the exceptional nature [of the Coronavirus quarantine], inter-municipal services must compulsorily establish telephone information points at transport terminals, and optionally by other non-face-to-face information means such as a website or email.

“The terminals that are in urban areas defined by the Ministry of Transportation and approved by the Logistics and Transportation Center will remain open to serve the routes authorized for this purpose.”

As for inter-city mass-transport of passengers, “according to the mobility analysis of each district or metropolitan municipal authority, the enabled offer [of passenger transport] may not exceed 50% of the maximum offer in each system,” the Ministry added.


Colombia President Ivan Duque announced April 4 that his administration likely will decide early this week whether and how strict the current national Coronavirus quarantine will extend beyond the presumptive April 13 expiration.

“We are working with scientists, epidemiologists, infectious disease specialists within the team of the Ministry of Health and the National Institute of Health [INS] -- and depending on how the reading of the epidemiological curve is, from the beginning of next week [April 6-11] we will be able to say if the current measures are extended or if, on the contrary, we go from a ‘total mandatory preventive isolation’ to an isolation that is intelligent,” meaning more-specific, targeted measures, President Duque said.

As of April 5, the Ministry of Health reported 1,485 cases of Cornavirus nationally, with 35 deaths (none in Antioquia) and 88 people fully recovered. Bogota continues to register the most cases (725) followed by Cali/Valle del Cauca (196) and then Medellin/Antioquia (172).

Currently, all Colombian residents 70 years and older are in quarantine until May 30 with the exception of venturing out for food, medicines, health care and banking.

What’s more, many cities (including metro Medellin) have additional “pico y cedula” restrictions that effectively limit even these grocery/pharmacy/banking trips to just two days of each week -- not just for those 70 and older, but rather for all residents.

Meanwhile, schools and universities are shut down during the current quarantine, with many students attending “virtual” classes via internet connections. Most commercial enterprises likewise are shuttered -- leaving millions temporarily unemployed -- although workers continue laboring in supermarkets, pharmacies, banks, fuel stations, power stations, utilities, health care, food production, farming, freight transport, public safety, certain essential construction sites and local public transport.

Further, air traffic is suspended along with much inter-city bus traffic -- with Medellin having already shuttered both its North and South terminals.

What’s more, the Ministry of Health announced April 4 that all people moving in and around congested areas in Colombia must start wearing protective masks. Examples include:

1. “Public transport systems (buses, Transmilenio, taxis);
2. “Areas where there is a massive influx of people (market squares, supermarkets, banks, pharmacies, among others) where it is not possible to maintain a minimum distance of one meter.
3. “People with respiratory symptoms: Risk groups (adults over 70 years, people with cardiovascular diseases, diseases that compromise their immune system, cancer, HIV, pregnant women and chronic respiratory diseases).”

In addition, “people with confirmed diagnosis for Covid-19 and their close contacts should not leave the place where they are carrying out their mandatory preventive isolation (14 days without exception),” according to the Ministry.

These Ministry of Health mask-mandates are in addition to a new order from the Mayor of Medellin requiring all passengers on the “Metro” rail, bus, aerial tram and streetcar system to wear protective masks starting Tuesday, April 7.

As for potential upcoming modifications or extensions to the existing national quarantine, President Duque explained that “intelligent isolation” measures would at minimum include “protection and restriction of the elderly,” plus “restrictions on the educational system” as well as “rules of distancing.”

“Measures such as those that have been implemented in South Korea or even in Singapore show that activities with greater and better health protocols” gradually can be adopted following an initial, drastic quarantine of nearly everyone, he said. But such gradual flexibilities will depend upon “improving testing capacity, improving capacity of isolating those with the disease and maintaining the protection of older adults, children and young people,” he added.

The ultimate goals of “intelligent isolation” during the crisis must include protection of "life, health, the most vulnerable, employment and maintainence of social and economic resilience,” he added.


Medellin-based electric power generation giant Isagen revealed in an April 2 filing with Colombia’s Superfinanciera corporate oversight agency that its full-year 2019 net income rose 9% year-on-year, to COP$495 billion (US$123 million).

However, fourth-quarter (4Q) 2019 net income dropped 62% year-on-year, to COP$144 billion (US$35.8 million), as lower rainfall in Colombia led to a 23% net decline in hydropower output.

Isagen is the third-largest power generator in Colombia at 3.03 gigawatts (GW) capacity -- 90% of which is hydroelectric power.

Full-year earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) rose 28% year-on-year, to COP$1.9 trillion (US$472 million), while gross revenues rose 20%, to COP$3.2 trillion (US$795 million), according to Isagen.

During 2019, energy demand on Colombia’s national power grid (Sistema Interconectado Nacional, SIN) was up 4% year-on-year. However, accumulated generation by Isagen for full-year 2019 dipped 8% year-on-year.

During 4Q 2019, hydropower contributions to the SIN were only 77% of the historical average, although for full-year 2019, hydropower accounted for 88% of the Colombian total -- still down from 2018 because of lower total rainfall.

During 2019, the average power price received by generators to the national grid was COP$229 (US$0.057) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), 98% higher than the average price recorded in 2018.

Isagen credited its over-all improvement in 2019 financial results to “higher energy sales revenue in contracts as a result of better prices” as well as sales to the national grid “largely due to the fact that since March [2019], the [820-MW] Sogamoso power plant [in Santander] started to provide power” to the national grid.

Aside from the Sogamoso plant, Isagen’s other power plants include the 1.24-GW “San Carlos” hydropower plant in Antioquia; the 396-MW “Miel 1” hydropower plant in Caldas; the 300-MW “Termocentro” thermal power plant in Santander; the 170-MW “Jaguas” hydroelectric power plant in Antioquia; the 80-MW “Amoyá” hydroelectric plant in Tolima and the 26-MW “Calderas” hydroelectric plant in Antioquia.

Isagen’s majority shareholder is BRE Colombia Hydro Investments Ltd, a division of Toronto-based Brookfield Asset Management. BRE’s strategic focus is on “development of a portfolio of renewable energies that take advantage of sources such as water, wind and sunlight,” according to the company.


The Mayor of Medellin announced April 1 that to reduce Coronavirus threats, only persons with specific cedula numbers can venture out for groceries, drugs and banking – two days each week – starting the first minute after midnight April 2 until the national quarantine ends -- presumptively on April 13.

“Each person will have two days a week -- between 7:00 a.m.  and 8:00 p. m -- so that you can provide your home with groceries, medicines and toiletries, and carry out bank procedures,” according to the Mayor’s office.

“This measure will govern as long as the mandatory preventive isolation determined by the national government in decree 457 of 2020 is maintained.”

According to the Mayor, the following cedula numbers are EXEMPT from quarantine for shopping, drugs and banking trips on the following days:

Mondays: Cedula numbers ending in 1-2-3
Tuesdays: Cedula numbers ending in 4-5-6.
Wednesdays: Cedula numbers ending in 7-8-9
Thursdays: Cedula numbers ending in 0-1-2
Fridays: Cedula numbers ending in 3-4-5
Saturdays: Cedula numbers ending in 6-7-8
Sundays: Cedula numbers ending in 0-9

Medellin joins other nearby municipalities including Envigado, Rionegro and El Retiro, all of which have already adopted variable-number "pico y cedula" restrictions on shopping and banking.

In Medellin, violators of "pico y cedula" will face fines of up-to COP$932,0000 (US$228), according to the Mayor.

According to the Colombia Ministry of Health, as of April 1, Medellin/Antioquia accounted for 107 of the 1,065 Coronavirus cases nationally, of which nationally 17 have died --none in Antioquia -- and 39 have fully recovered so far.


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About Medellin Herald

Medellin Herald is a locally produced, English-language news and advisory service uniquely focused upon a more-mature audience of visitors, investors, conference and trade-show attendees, property buyers, expats, retirees, volunteers and nature lovers.

U.S. native Roberto Peckham, who founded Medellin Herald in 2015, has been residing in metro Medellin since 2005 and has traveled regularly and extensively throughout Colombia since 1981.

Medellin Herald welcomes your editorial contributions, comments and story-idea suggestions. Send us a message using the "contact" section.

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